BLA-BLA-BLA------TRIPOTAGES                                                               
                    TIM-TIM


 CNS News United Nations
405 E 42nd St. , Room 301
New York, NY 10017
Telephone: (212) 963-7129, Fax: (212) 496-0829
Email: cnsnews22@aol.com

BIENVENUE

Par le Correspondent de CNS News
a Port-au-Prince


Agence de Nouvelles des Caraibes   


                                                                                                                                                    


 
S
erge Beaulieu "Bouboule"


IN MEMORIAM

SERGE BEAULIEU

March 11, 1938 December 12, 2004

 

 Acknowledged as having one of the most brilliant minds of his generation, Serge Beaulieu dedicated his life to making both his homeland of Haiti and the world at large a better place.

 

May his legacy remain and be carried on…

 

We miss you, Bouboule.  We celebrate the day of your birth and mourn your passing.

 

    Serge Beaulieu
       "Bouboule"
 
      Le Leader Inconteste
     de la
        Majorite Nationale

       
March 11, 1938 - December 12, 2004 
********

 

Serge Beaulieu passed away on December 12, 2004 after 2-1/2 year valiant fight against lung cancer.  For much of that time his quality of life was high, he continued his daily activities, and he asked that no one be told he was sick.  Realizing that it had become a losing battle, during the last two months he told people he was dying but continued to enjoy his life to the very end. 

 

A TIME TO HONOR AND REMEMBER  A GREAT  HUMAN SPIRIT


Monday, December 12, 2005 is the first anniversary of the death of our beloved Serge Beaulieu, leader of Haiti's Majorite National, broadcaster extraordinaire on Radio Liberte.  It is a time to honor and remember him. 

At a memorial service for Serge in New York, the priest said that when we find someone to love, it is God who knit the bonds that joined us.  We thank God for having given life to Serge Beaulieu, a man who dedicated his life to make things better in his homeland of Haiti, who stood for what is right and just in the world, who helped everyone he could from all walks of life and who was the voice for those who needed a spokesperson to protect and stand up for them.

To all of our Haitian friends and colleagues who have helped us during the past year to preserve what Serge built, we thank you.  You are true patriots to your country and your people.

Today we received a beautiful letter from Sean Baker, a young American man who knew Serge for many years.  We know that these words from the heart convey what many would like to say, and we want to share the thoughts with you in celebration of the life and good works of Serge Beaulieu.

12.10.05

Sondra,

I don't even know where to begin.  It's hard for me to imagine what this past year must have been like for you.  Serge is gone.  I still don't completely accept it.  As I write the words they don't seem real.  It's been one year, and I still haven't mourned him. 

I'm not sure what I want to say in this letter.  I just want you to know that I feel your pain.  I feel your loss.  Serge meant so much to me.  His existence was so alive and so original.  It may sound crazy, but I remember every conversation we had.  I can still hear his words, even from when I was a kid.  The seeds he planted in my mind and heart continue to grow as I realize more and more the importance of the messages he conveyed.  He was the most human person I ever met.  The more I think about him the more I miss him, the more his being gone becomes real.  He was so great.  He was the kind of person that affected just about everyone he came in contact with for the better.  How may people in history have been like that?  He was such an asset, such a resource, such a guide and inspiration to so many people.  He was an example of how to be a kinder, funnier, more compassionate person.  I love him so much, and I feel like I let him down.  I was never there to say goodbye.  Never there to hold his hand or read to him at the end.  I know he didn't feel that way, it's just something I need to get out.

He meant so much to me, and I just wanted you to know that you are not alone in your grief.

Love,
Sean

 





TRIBUTES AND CONDOLENCES

Bouboule was like a father to me. He gave me advice all the time.

After 1986, Serge Beaulieu, was the only one who said that we can't destroy the country, we have to pull ourselves together and rebuild the country.  I don't think we're ever going to have anybody like him again in Haiti.

       A colleague

***********

Dear Sondra,  

I was so sad to learn of the untimely passing of your husband, Serge. I remember your telling me of all the wonderful things that he had accomplished. It is truly a shame that the flame of such a wonderful spirit was extinguished so soon. I am sure that Serge’s life and enthusiasm touched not only those whose lives he touched in Haiti but also those who worked with him in his endeavors. I hope that memories of good times spent together sustain you through your grief.  

Best wishes,
Laura

***********

Sondra,

I am so sorry for your loss. But I know you made your husband’s last months and days easier by being by his side.

Adrienne Freeman

***********

A tree has been planted in memory of Serge Beaulieu. May this serve as a living tribute to his memory.  

Noam Marans

***********

Dearest Sondra,  

Serge and I had a very special connection. I will miss him very much. The beauty of those who were dear to us moving on is that we make them part of us here and now. I will think of Serge while I journey around the world with a smile.  

All my love,
Don Goldberg    

**********

Dear Sondra,  

I will remember your beloved husband with a gift to a local Haitian advocacy organization.  

Bill Gralnick
Boca Raton , Florida

***********

Dear Sondra,  

Please accept my condolences on the death of Serge. I understand that he was a very special man who fought a valiant fight. I know he will be greatly missed.  

I hope you are able to find strength and healing in your warm and wonderful memories.  

Warm regards,
Saundra Mandel

**********

Dear Sondra,  

Thank you for your very kind and considerate note regarding Serge. I know that Serge and you, too, went through a lot. You both were courageous inspirations to me. He was a lovely man, and I am saddened.  

My sincere condolences.  Words seem useless.  

Sincerely yours,  

James S. Schutz, M.D.

************

Dear Sondie,  

No matter how much you prepare, no one is ever ready for the finale, It is always hard losing a loved one. Yet Serge, the fighter, gave you the beautiful gift of saying good-bye and with dignity. I know you will always carry him with you everywhere you go, and his legacy will be a part of you. I’m sure already you have many projects to be involved in and will remain connected to his dreams and stirrings. I’m glad I spent some special time with him before he left us. How fortunate you were that he was lucid till the very end. This is a real blessing.  

Janice

*************  

Dear Mrs. Beaulieu,  

I was so sad to hear the news of the passing of Serge. He was a wonderful person, and I feel for your loss. I don’t know what else to say except you’re in my thoughts.  

Fondly,

Anne

***********

 

Serge was very courageous…. His memory will live on, may his soul rest in peace.  I will share your letter with my staff—it is more poetry than a letter. 

In deepest sympathy,  

Elliot J. Rayfield, MD

                        ***************

January 30, 2005  

Dear Sondra,  

It is with the deepest sadness that Suzanne and I heard of the death of Serge.  He was not just a patient, but also a dear friend.  From the moment of his diagnosis we knew, and Serge knew, that his prognosis was not good.  Serge fought a losing battle, but he fought with everything he could.  He lost his battle with cancer, but his life was a triumph.  Diplomat, businessman, husband, father, he was successful at everything else, a model for us all.  Serge was intelligent and generous with his intellect and with his time.  I know he was intelligent, because he liked my writing and kept everything that I wrote.  

We were honored to have Serge and you at Marisa’s wedding and glad that both of you had a good time.  

I have spoken to some of the people who knew him from the hospital.  Even in the most difficult time of his life, he touched them.  They felt better for having known him.  They were saddened by his death.  

Serge Beaulieu was a true Renaissance man.  Serge was a true friend.  

Serge will be missed.  

Sincerely,
Dr. Everett M. Lautin
Dr. Suzanne Levine

                                                                                *********

Serge was very courageous…. His memory will live on, may his soul rest in peace.  I will share your letter with my staff—it is more poetry than a letter. 

In deepest sympathy,  

Elliot J. Rayfield, MD

                      ***********

Dear Sondra,
We just wanted to say how sorry we were about Serge’s death. He was such a wonderful person and a real inspiration to all.  I’m so happy Stacey and Pierre ’s baby will continue with his middle name.  

Much love,  
Carol and Bryan Leyton

                        *********

Dear Sondra,  

We’re so sorry that Serge is not with us anymore. I’ve just told it to my parents, and they can’t believe it, either; he was too young! But, still, it’s good to know that he didn’t have to suffer a long time. The stamps on the envelope don’t fit to our sad mood, but I took them on purpose to remind all of us of Serge’s special sense of humor. We’ll miss Serge!  

With all our love and deepest sympathy,

Veronica and Gerard Blaser

                                                                                    ********

It is with a heavy heart that I must let you know that our beloved colleague, Serge Beaulieu, passed away. Serge, the bureau chief of Caribbean Network System,was a respected member of the FPA for more than 40 years. Our sincere condolences to Sondra.

       Foreign Press Association News
       "Chronicle" column by Suzanne Adams
       January 2005 Edition

**********

HAÏTI A PERDU UN GRAND HOMME. 

Député  serge BEAULIEU, celui dont la majorité nationale admire le  bon coeur et les bonnes manières,celui qui était le bouboule de tout le monde ,le grand rassembleur,président du parti authentique national,député de la 44e legislature candidat au senat pour le departement de l'oeust pdg de la grande station de radio LIBERTÉ  est aujourd'hui parti pour un autre monde, les grands hommes ne meurent pas,c'est vrai que bouboule n'est pas mort,il disparait.Bouboule nous a tout simplement précédés.Il aime tellement  se mettre au service des autres ,bon négociateur.Il est allé négocier un  autre con-trat social pour la majorité nationale d'HAÏTI et pour le monde pourquoi pas.

Je partage très sincèrement la douleure de cette perte et envoie mes sincères condoléances a sa courageuse famille, spécialement a sa femme,   "Sondra"

 [English Translation]

HAITI HAS LOST A GREAT MAN

Congressman Serge Beaulieu, admired by the Haitian people for his good heart and fine ways, known as “Bouboule” by everyone, the great bringer-together, president of the Parti Authentique National (PAN), deputy in the 44th legislature, candidate for the Senate for the Department of the West, director-general of the great station Radio Liberté, has left for another world.  Great men don’t die.  It’s true that Bouboule isn’t dead—he has left.  Bouboule has simply gone before us.  He so much loved to be at the service of others, good mediator.  He is going to negotiate a new social contract for the national majority of Haiti and for the world—why not?

    I share most sincerely the pain of this loss and send my sincere condolences to his courageous family, especially to his wife, Sondra.

                    ARISTYL Cambronne
                    January 10, 2005

*********

Serge Beaulieu"Bouboule"
                              11 Mars 1938- 12 Décembre 2004

New York. Serge Beaulieu, ami d'enfance des proches de sa génération, nous a laissé, suite à un cancer du poumon qu'il a vaillamment combattu pendant 30 mois à New York. Durant les deux derniers mois, réalisant la bataille perdue,à ses proches amis, il confia la fin proche de ses jours, mais continua sa vie d'allégresse jusqu'à sa dernière heure. Serge a sa place dans le monde artistique comme acteur de grand talent à La Société Nationale d'Art Dramatique, (la SNAD), à l'Institut Français et au Conservatoire d'Art Dramatique. A radio Caraïbes, il a laissé ses empreintes d'Annonceur et d'Editeur. Aux Nations Unies à New York, il s'est fait bien remarqué comme Journaliste, Correspondant en Chef de CNS News, Caribbean Network Systems, avec sa présence et ses questions sur l'actualité mondiale. Sur les ondes de sa station, Radio Liberté, à Port-au-Prince, Serge enleva le sommeil à ses milliers d'auditeurs assidus, à l'occasion de ses analyses politiques.
Sur les ondes de Radyo Pa Nou de Brooklyn, on pouvait l’entendre chaque Dimanche matin comme invité spécial faisant valoir ses connaissances de  la politique troublée d’Haiti.

 Et pour son goût exquis des lettres et des grands écrivains, en sa mémoire on doit répéter brièvement ces lignes qu'il aima exclamer:

 "Si vous pouvez être amant sans être fou d'amour, 
   Si vous pouvez être fort sans cesser d'être tendre, 
    Et, se sentant haï, sans hair à votre tour, pouvant lutter et vous défendre;
     Si vous pouvez supporter vos paroles travesties par des gueux pour exciter des sots,
       Et d'entendre mentir sur vous leurs bouches folles sans mentir vous-même d'un mot; 
        Si vous pouvez rester digne tout en étant populaire, 
         Si vous pouvez rester peuple en conseillant les rois, 
          Et si vous pouvez aimer tous vos amis en frères, sans qu'aucun d'eux soit tout pour vous ;   
            Alors les Rois les Dieux la Chance et la Victoire seront à tout jamais vos esclaves soumis,
             Et, ce qui vaut bien mieux que les Rois et la Gloire, Vous serez un homme".

 

From New York, with condolences to the family and friends of Serge Beaulieu:

Serge Beaulieu, a childhood friend of those close to his generation, has left us, after valiantly battling lung cancer during 30 months in New York.  During the last two months, realizing that he was losing the battle, he confided to his close friends that the end was near, but nevertheless he continued his life with an attitude of cheerfulness right up to the last hour.  Serge has secured his place in the artistic world as an actor of great talent at the National Society of Dramatic Arts (la SNAD), at The French Institute and at the Dramatic Arts Conservatory. On Caribbean Radio, he left his mark as broadcaster and editor. At the United Nations in New York, he was a well respected journalist--Chief Correspondent for CNS News, Caribbean Network System--by his presence and his questions concerning current world events.  On Radio Liberte in Port -au-Prince, Serge stirred thousands of hardworking listeners from sleep with his astute political analysis. On Radio Pa Nou in Brooklyn, NY, he could be heard every Sunday morning as a special guest who commanded respect for his knowledge of the troubling political situation in Haiti.

He had excellent taste in literature and enjoyed the great writers, and he often read excerpts on the air to stimulate our thoughts and give us comfort in troubling times.


 *************


Dec. 28, 2004

Serge was a nice man.  He was always willing to help anybody.

Abdellatif Kabbaj
Chief, Media Accreditation and Liaison Unit
United Nations


****************

Serge had so much to offer to so many, and I know his hope was that the Haitian people would realize the love that he had in his heart for them and his sincere desire for peace and unity for his homeland. Every hour of every day he would do, think, and talk about what to do and how to make the lives of everyone—Haitians, family, and friends—better and more productive. 

 

A man like Serge comes along once in a lifetime, and we were all privileged to know him.  Serge made such an impact on so many lives and I know will continue to do so for generations to come—his words and spirit will live on.


Linda Baker

General Manager, Radio Liberté


***********

Our hearts are all with you 
in this difficult time.
But as the morning dew
Refreshes the divine
Flowers of all the world,
His memory
Appears to light
To soothe our grief.  

Then, like the Chinese proverb,
We can all say to ourselves
“Better light up a candle
than to curse obscurity.”  

The Blouin Family

*************

He saw a chance to do something for his country, and he did his best.
             A friend

He died the way he lived--with dignity, and he fought to the end.
             An admirer

He was no pale shadow on the human landscape.  There's something pretty fantastic about that.
             Stephen Steinlight

Dear Sondra,

I was so sorry to hear of your loss of your beloved husband, Serge. I hope you find comfort in the attitude he had and the life he led. It takes a strong person to fight a losing battle with such a wonderful outlook.

I wish you and your family a year of nothing but joy and happiness.

             Susie Baumohl

Serge was always a gentleman and a pleasure to know.
             Dawn Maloney

Dear Sondra,

       I am sure that your husband truly appreciated your love and support as he went through his long and final trial. I hope your memories help you through the difficult times ahead.
             Lynn Kroll

Dear Sondra,

 

You cannot have any idea how I feel after hearing the news that Serge passed away. I feel very bad. Serge was a great man.

 

You could not imagine how popular he was in Haiti. One day he came to visit me—and I never had a chance to talk to him, because everyone who was passing by the house saw him and stopped to say, “Hello, Bouboule.” And he hadn’t even met them before!

 

Everybody is very sad. Please extend the condolences to Céline and Linda.

 

Eveline Dalencour

 

In fond memory, Eveline Dalencour wearing the beret Bouboule gave her.

 

                        ********

Dear Sondra,
 
As you know, Serge was a major contributor in the factors that shaped my life. When I came to the United States in 1973, he was one of the first persons my father introduced me to as one of his friends. Soon after that, I was enrolled in the Cric-Crac Theater Workshop founded by Serge.  It was in this workshop that I began my study of black history, the performing arts, and poetry. It was there as well that I acquired the leadership skills that allowed me to do all the things that I have done so far.
 
Serge and I remained very close. He had become my mentor, and I could talk to him about any subject that I had a question about. As a Haitian, I found Serge to be one of a kind. He was open minded, a good listener, and could agree to disagree. He was very caring, and his agenda was always: "What can I do to make Haiti a better country."
 
His passing is a great loss to all who really knew him. His teaching will live with me, and that is one of the best contributions one person can make in the life of another.
 
As the poem says: He Lives.
 
With deep sympathy and the comfort that he lives through us.
 
Albert Depas
[Haitian painter, sculptor, and poet]
December 20, 2004

 

*****

 

Serge Beaulieu was for us a torch to light the way for the success of Haiti .  Unfortunately, he left us a little too soon, because he was needed as the as the leader of the majority in this time of hate. Bouboule brought us together.  Everyone loved him—even his enemies. He will remain in the hearts of the Haitians forever and will be considered as the ideal president of Haiti .

 

We love Bouboule, and the victory will be ours in the next round of elections, for our creed remains: “Unity of the Haitian people.”

 

Voix d’eau, Voix d’or

Orlando, Florida

 

******

Sondra:

 
I was so deeply saddened to learn about Serge.  I know how devoted you were to him and how important his work for the Haitian people was to him.  From everything you've ever told me about him, he was a man of great intelligence, integrity, dignity, compassion and commitment.  These are qualities that you and he have very much in common, and I'm sure that's why you shared such a special relationship.
 
Sondra, please know that I am thinking of you and your family at this painful time with friendship and affection. 

Janice Hyman-Wolpo

******

I am a son of Cavaillon, like Bouboule. I would hope that the rest of the Haitian people understand the trajectory of that great man--we from the Southern Department of Haiti know a lot about it.

 

Serge Beaulieu was my role model in radio-diffusion, and I have been successful in my communities of Philadelphia , West Palm Beach , and New York . I am profoundly touched by that loss, and I send my condolences to his family members and friends, who surely admired him.

 

Haiti just lost a son, different from most, with an endless love for his people and his homeland.

 

My father, “Tet Kale,” will never forget the humanism of this man and is also very sad about the loss.

 

Joel Leon

 

********

 

December 22, 2004
 
Dear Sondra,
 
    I was deeply saddened to learn that your beloved husband passed away. Please accept my heartfelt condolences.
 
    I know how devoted the two of you were to each other and can only imagine the sense of pain and loss you must be enduring....
 
    May the memory of your husband's life, and his steadfast commitment to the values of freedom and human dignity, always
be a source of comfort.
 
                                In deepest sympathy,
 
                                David A. Harris
                                Executive Director
                                The American Jewish Committee
 

*******

From                     Radio Horizon 2000  95,7 FM Port-au-prince
To                         Beaulieu's Family
Objet                     Our Sympathies 
 
Dear Madam Beaulieu, 
                                       The Genaral Direction of Radio Horizon 2000 presents you all his sympathies for the death of the pionner of Profesionnal FM radio Talk Show ' Serge Beaulieu" 
                                        
                                        I have a chance to work during several years with him at  Radio Liberté  as  a  Speaker  to become  the  Program  Director.  
 
                                         The lost of Beaulieu is a great cataclysm for the world modern Press. All the future generations will learn and study his story. That the way life is. 
 
                                         I wish you courage !
 
                JB Baudelaire DUBIC
General Director of Radio Horizon 2000 
 Former Program Director of Radio Liberté

* * * * * * 

Tuesday December 14th, 2004

Dear Sondra,

Audrey and I were so very sorry to hear that Serge passed on over the last weekend; when I returned yesterday from a trip to Canada, Vernon told me the news as we rode up the elevator together, much as other important pieces of our lives come forward as we come and go in this little vertical community we live in.

Except for some extended conversations in the lobby or on the street, I never had the pleasure of getting to know Serge beyond some of his strongly held beliefs as reflected in our building and his most interesting life in Haiti, where his radio and television stations had been taken over not just once but many times.  There was a certain philosophical approach to life that I sensed in him, an approach in which his quick sense of humor played a large part, but which also hid, I suspect, a very profound sense of human striving and dignity.  I could feel this other, deeper side, although we never spoke of it. Audrey found Serge to be absolutely delightful as they smiled together, during chance meetings in the elevator, and was happy to have him as a neighbor.  The recent round of by-law committee meetings has certainly cemented that relationship with you.  If you need us, you have only to give a call.

So now at this profound time, I can only say that I have always believed that each of us is here for a reason.  I think we choose to be present on Earth so that we may learn by helping other people, that we overcome our fear and extend ourselves in kindness so that others may benefit from our gift and that our own soul may grow.  Certainly Serge accomplished that in our little community by supporting others in need.  He must have done the same, I know, in the larger world community in which he moved.

Audrey and I will miss him, and send you our wish for peace in this time of great loss.  Just as our need to come here for our own soul's growth binds us all together as a group, those with whom we form an even stronger bond of love will always be connected.  We choose those we share that bond with, and those strong ties of the heart do not end in death but go on forever.

All our love,

Audrey & Dean Irwin

                                                             * * * * * * * * 

PSAUME 91

A l'abri chez le Dieu Tres-Haut

Celui qui se place a l'abri
aupres du Dieu Tres-Haut
et se met sous la protection du Tout-Puissant,
celui-la doit dire au Seigneur:
"Tu es la forteresse ou je trouve refuge,
tu es mon Dieu, j'ai confiance en toi."

C'est le Seigneur qui te delivera
des pieges que l'on tend devant toi
et de la peste meurtriere.
Il te protegera,
tu trouveras chez lui un refuge,
comme un poussin sous les ailes de sa mere.
Sa fidelite est un bouclier protecteur.
Tu n'auras rien a redouter:
ni les dangers terrifiants de la nuit,
ni la fleche qui vole pendant le jour,
ni la peste qui rode dans l'obscurite,
ni l'insolation qui frappe en plein midi.
Oui, meme si ces fleaux
font mille victimes pres de toi
et dix mille encore a ta droite,
il ne t'arrivera rien.
Ouvre seulement les yeux
et tu verras comment Dieu paie les mechants,
Oui, le Seigneur est pour toi un abri,
tu as fait du Tres-Haut ton refuge.
Aucun mal ne t'atteindra,
aucun malheur n'approchera de chez toi.
Car le Seigneur donnera l'ordre a ses anges
de te garder ou que tu ailles.
Ils te porteront sur leurs mains
pour eviter que ton pied ne heurte une pierre.
Tu marcheras sans risque
sur le lion ou la vipere,
tu pourras pietiner
le fauve ou le serpent.

Il est attache a moi, dit le Seigneur,
je le mettrai donc a l'abri;
je le protegerai
parce qu'il sait qui je suis.
S'il m'appelle au secours, je lui repondrai.
Je serai a ses cotes dans la detresse,
je le delivrerai, je lui rendrai son honneur.
Je lui donnerai une vie longue et pleine,
et je lui ferai voir que je suis son sauveur.

"IF" 
By Rudyard Kipling
 

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies,
Or, being hated, don't give way to hating,
And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream - and not make dreams your master;
If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with triumph and disaster
And treat those two imposters just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to broken,
And stoop and build 'em up with wornout tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breath a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on";

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings - nor lose the common touch;
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you;
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds' worth of distance run -
Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,
And - which is more - you'll be a Man my son!

********

 

 

***********


"Kindness in words creates confidence. 
Kindness in thinking creates profoundness. 
Kindness in giving creates love." - Tao Te Ching
Artist - Unknown

***********

 

 

 

AFRICA AND THE NGOs—ANOTHER LOOK AT THE LEGACY OF KOFI ANNAN

By Serge Beaulieu
UN Bureau Chief

New York, December 4, 2004 (CNS NEWS)
We knew it was going to happen, but we did not know that it was going to be so early nor that the career of Kofi Annan was going to be slashed at with such fury. From the man who saved the world from uncertainty in Iraq, when we all applauded his efforts, we have watched him evolve from a shy bureaucrat into a sharp diplomat on the world scene.

He reorganized the United Nations, opening the UN to the Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), fulfilling their dreams of participation.

Everybody got something. The Africans fought him, and he fought back by creating African development missions in every village to combat the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Two months ago in one of my stories I asked Kofi Annan to create his own legacy by defining his own mission. I suggested that his legacy would not be as a super Kofi Annan for the West. He needs to retrieve his unique vision and individual identity and keep his focus on his own continent of Africa, where so many are dying from war, disease, and poverty.

 


 

 

THOUGHT FOR TODAY

"No one ever attains very eminent success by simply doing what is required of him; it is the amount and excellence of what is over and above the required that determines the greatness of ultimate distinction."

Charles Kendall Adams
1835-1902, Professor of History and Author

 

 

"When we do the best that we can, we never know what miracle is wrought in our life, or in the life of another."

Helen Keller
1880-1968, Blind/Deaf Author, Lecturer

 

"Never measure the height of a mountain until you have reached the top. Then you will see how low it was."

Dag Hammarskjold
1905-1961, Swedish Statesman, Secretary-General of the U.N.

 

"There are no hopeless situations; there are only people who have grown hopeless about them."

Clare Boothe Luce
1902-1987, American Diplomat and Writer

 

 


HAITI--AGAIN AND AGAIN
By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief

New York, November 12, 2004 (CNS NEWS)

The subject of Haiti is on everyone's tongue, but when it comes to making a firm decision, there is hesitation, and everyone seems to take a break.  How can a country with such a past come to this state of decay?

What a deception when the legendary general Toussaint Louverture was taken to France and imprisoned in the Jura mountains, a prisoner of his former master Napoleon Bonaparte, and then died in 1803, alone in exile in this foreign land.

Haiti is still begging to become part of the world's history two hundred years after General Jean Jacques Dessalines directed the battle of the slaves for the independence of the island, which, in 1804, became the country of Haiti, the world's first black republic.

The United Nations is now in charge, and everyone is waiting to see what's next.  Thousands of foreign troops are stationed there, waiting to bring peace between a bunch of soldiers from the former Haitian army and another group, the partisans of former president Jean Bertrand Aristide, all calling for "democracy."

 

Painting by Hertz Nazaire

LOOK FOR A HAITIAN MIRACLE

By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief  

New York, November 5, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

Now that the election is over in the United States, heads should be turned to the tiny Republic of Haiti , which still represents a grave menace to the U.S. There, 8 million people are living in abject poverty, without hope of any respect for law.   

The Bush Administration had promised to take the Haitian matter into its hands as soon as possible.  The international community felt duty bound to help restore order and stability.  Millions of dollars have been raised.  The United Nations has thousands of soldiers on the ground.  They are only waiting for a commander-in-chief to give Haitians the hope of living a decent life.  

Now the question is: Is Haiti a priority?  I’m sure that the new administration is not going to let this country die a few miles from its shore.  It is important that the alarm be rung and the proper actions be taken.  It is not a question of months, it is a question of weeks.  The actors are all in position.  Let’s find out when the action will begin.

 

 

 


Haitians walk by Brazilian UN peacekeeping soldiers guarding Haiti's National Palace

THE HAITI EXPLOSION

By Serge Beaulieu

October 10, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  
Last week we suggested that the Haiti situation should be taken care of by the highest personality of the United Nations.  We proposed that Haiti should be the legacy of Secretary-General Kofi Annan.  After reading our story, an official of the Organization of American States emailed us, “Would be interesting to know of any reaction from the court of Mr. Annan?”  So far, nyet.  

In the meantime, Gonaives , Haiti ’s third largest city, remains in open rebellion against everyone, where two international peacekeepers have been wounded.  

Everyone is busy with the forthcoming US presidential election, and no one seems interested in Haiti .  An unpopular prime minister has been going back and forth from Port-au-Prince to Gonaives , his home town, without being able to calm things down.  The Haitian’s are complaining that they are not receiving the attention promised after Hurricane Jeanne devastated the town.  

Elsewhere in the country, the people are calling for the return of former president Jean Bertrand Aristide, and no leader has emerged who is capable of talking to the masses.  

The questions now are:  How fast will it take for the situation to get completely out of control?  Are we going to have a Darfur or a Rwanda in Haiti ?  In a recent New York Times Op-Ed, Romeo Dallaire of Canada, former head of the UN Peacekeeping Force in Rwanda and Uganda , renewed his previous warnings about danger spots in the world.

 

 

 

Secretary-General Kofi Annan (left) meeting with former Prime Minister of Sudan, Sadiq Al Mahidi. 
(UN Photo #EDD560)

HAITI – KOFI ANNAN’S LEGACY

By Serge Beaulieu
UN Bureau Chief  

October 5, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

Considering the grandeur of Kofi Annan, people will be amused at this proposal to have Haiti as his legacy.  Nevertheless, we are putting it forth.  This brings to mind how Kofi Annan, on his first visit to Washington , responded to a journalist at the Foreign Press Center by saying, “Well, one can always profit from unsolicited advice.”  

Annan is at the end of his term of office.  The African arena has been a mess for him.  The Darfur , Sudan situation can become another Uganda .  To his credit, the struggle to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic is well funded.  

Haiti , which has been almost a failed state, is on the brink of going either way.  In order to change the situation, the country needs a powerful commander capable of changing the whole thing, especially with the financial power to do so.  

The forthcoming election in Haiti is impossible.  There are no candidates in view with enough strength or popularity to stop the insecurity.  The only possibility is for Kofi Annan to take over and manage the affairs of the country as Dag Hammarskjold did in the Congo in the 1960’s.  

The United Nations is already present on the ground with thousands of soldiers, and the financial help for Haiti is ready.  A Marshall Plan should be put into action.  

Hammarskjold did not risk his prestige as Secretary-General when he became involved personally in the Congo .  Instead, he made the Congo his legacy.  We are not discussing his success or failure; we are discussing his direct involvement.  

I have been watching Kofi Annan for years.  I still cannot determine his real thoughts about Haiti .  But I am sure that, as an African, he is intrigued by the world’s first black republic, and I would not be surprised that, sooner or later, he will make a move to help this failing state reemerge, as Hammarskjold did in the Congo in the 1960’s.  Perhaps what he needs is a Ralph Bunche along with a change in the Security Council’s mandate.  

Haitians must realize that they have to swallow their pride it they want their country to regain its position in the family of nations.  

                                                                        ####

 

TO REWRITE THE STORY OF HAITI …$1.08 BILLION PLEDGED

By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief  

New York , July 22, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

After a two day meeting in Washington this week, the international community— including the World Bank, the European Union, the Inter-American Development Bank, France, the United States, and Canada—pledged $1.08 billion for the development of Haiti.  $500 million of this sum had already been pledged and blocked by the U.S. , which was fighting the government of then-president Jean Bertrand Aristide.  

Now that the Latortue-Boniface Alexandre government has been installed by the U.S. , the door is wide open.  Aristide appears to be gone forever in his retreat in South Africa . However, his partisans continue to demonstrate for his return.  

The Secretary-General of the United Nations has designated a former Chilean diplomat, J. Gabriel Valdes, as his representative to Haiti .  

The question is: What is going to happen to Haiti.  

The Caricom countries, which until today are in rebellion against the manner in which the U.S. removed Aristide from office, will most likely finally come to accept the fait accompli and invite Haiti to return to the Caribbean family.  It will be good for them and good for Haiti , which will now command a strong market position if the pledged funds are released.  

The Latortue-Alexandre government is still in a situation where organizing elections is a challenge. The party of Aristide has already decided it will not participate. Nobody in Haiti seems to be in command of that party, and there are suspicions that Aristide is maneuvering from his exile in South Africa . Those who were waiting for his indictment in alleged drug business involvement are still waiting.  

Can elections be held without Aristide and his Lavalas party? The answer is probably yes, but the situation in Haiti will deteriorate into a greater division of the Haitian society.  

With over $1 billion pledged, a lot of jobs can be created, which may pacify a majority of the masses. But, the rich are going to become richer, and the spectacle of a country after 200 years of independence won’t have changed much from the days of slavery. With globalization there is no room for revolution. But, the number of the discontented—both in Haiti and around the world—is getting larger and larger.  

What should the Haitians do? First, they should accept any type of development from the international donors, since the country is in ruins. They should continue to strive toward political reconciliation, although this concept is not part of Haitian tradition. They should accept the Americans, whether they like them or not, and cooperate in the building of their own country. They need electricity, housing, drinking water, health care, and jobs. Only the Americans can provide this.  

Celebrating their 200 years of independence, Haitians should refrain from rejoicing, since their country is occupied by foreign troops, which include some from France , the country from which they won their independence two centuries ago. It is a sad story and a sad state of affairs.  

Haitians always think that the Vatican can intervene, since Haiti is officially a Roman Catholic country. They believed that when they were being slaughtered by Rafael Trujillo, dictator of neighboring Dominican Republic . Apparently the Pope has forgotten them, and perhaps God has also.  

French dramatist Alfred de Musset said in one of his plays: « La seule chose qui me reste au monde est d’avoir quelquefois pleurer». [The only thing that I have left is to be able to cry.]

 

From left: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Barbados Foreign Minister Billie Miller shake hands with Haiti's Interim Prime Minister Gerard Latortue, Haiti Foreign Minister Yvon Simeon, center, and Bahamas Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell after a press conference at the International airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, July, 14, 2004. Behind Billie Miller is Foreign Ministerof  Antigua and Barbuda Harold Lovell  (AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)
From left: Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Barbados Foreign Minister Billie Miller shake hands with Haiti's Interim Prime Minister Gerard Latortue, Haiti Foreign Minister Yvon Simeon, center, and Bahamas Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell after a press conference at the International airport in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Wednesday, July, 14, 2004. Behind Billie Miller is Foreign Ministerof Antigua and Barbuda Harold Lovell (Courtesy of AP )

CARICOM/HAITI BROUHAHA

By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief

United Nations, New York, July 14, 2004 (CNS NEWS)

A team of five foreign ministers from Caribbean countries is in Haiti this week to discuss a new approach to the dilemma of relations with the U.S.-backed Haitian government.

After the departure of Haiti's president Jean-Bertrand Aristide on February 29, Caricom's 14 member countries have tried very hard to show that they are in command in their region. But, with U.S. interference, they had to back off. They were not even able to convene a U.N. General Assembly meeting in order to find out what had happened to their man in Haiti, who claimed that he had been kidnapped, put on a plane, and sent to the Central African Republic, without his consent.

The U.S.-backed Latortue regime in Haiti quickly responded by announcing that it had broken relations with Jamaica, which had provided temporary refuge for Aristide after he left the Central African Republic.

During his subsequent visit to the United Nations last March, Latortue claimed that the question of Caricom was "behind us."

"Not so," said some Caribbean leaders.

At Caricom's recent Heads of State conference in Grenada, the question arose again. They decided to send a fact-finding mission to Haiti, comprised of five foreign ministers from Antigua, Barbados, the Bahamas, Trinidad, and Guyana.

In order to recognize the government of Haiti, the Caribbean Heads of State requested the following: release of Aristide's former prime minister Yves Neptune from jail; a date be set for a general election; a disarming of all banned forces, including the insurgents who overthrew Aristide; and a guarantee of full participation in the election, including the supporters of Jean Bertrand Aristide.

This is a diplomatic success for Caricom, which has been able to stand fast until now against the mighty United States.

On another front, U.N. Secretary- General Kofi Annan in a solo approach designated J. Gabriel Valdes, a former minister for foreign affairs of Chile, as his representative to Haiti, with a budget of more than $172 million for a 6-month period. With a cap of 8,000 troops, he knows that he is the real governor, especially when the World Bank is on the eve of approving another $924 million to put Haiti on its feet. 

The sad part of this is that the whole situation happened at the time Haiti was proudly celebrating the 200th anniversary of its revolution against imperialist forces of Europe. Haiti, the world's first black republic, is paying a heavy price for its past glory.

Let's watch.

 

########

 

 

 

 

                                                                                            Michelle Montas
                                                                                                                    Spokesperson for GA
                                                                                                                            President

U.N. GENERAL ASSEMBLY MEETS AGAIN

By Serge Beaulieu                                                                           
U.N. Bureau Chief

United Nations, New York, July 14, 2004 (CNS NEWS)

As was expected after the decision of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in favor of the Palestinian position regarding Israel's security fence, the General Assembly is reconvening this Friday to study the matter and, probably, issue a resolution.

Michelle Montas, spokesperson for the president of the GA, announced this decision at a  regular press briefing at headquarters. It was not a surprise to anyone, but one has to notice that in the case of Haiti's request to investigate allegations of kidnapping of its former president, the Assembly did not budge, nor did it in the case of Iraq. This seems to indicate that the question of Palestine is still alive and of great concern to the members of the international community.

Over the years, being unable to implement its own resolutions has weakened the power of the General Assembly. From 49 original members, the membership has grown to 191, giving the developing world a majority. That is precisely the concern of the Israeli government, which is fighting for survival.

The United States, an ally of Israel, has decided that the Palestinian question has to be decided by the Security Council, which is mandated by the Charter to solve the problem of peace and security in the world. It has even created a Quartet group for the sole purpose of bringing peace to the area. So far, nyet.

Asked if another decision of the General Assembly on this matter would not continue to weaken the power and prestige of the GA, the president's spokesperson said that a decision on this matter by the Assembly would be considered at least a moral victory.

 

 

 

GOVERNOR BILL RICHARDSON BRIEFS FOREIGN PRESS
ON UPCOMING DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION

By Sondra Singer Beaulieu  

New York, July 13, 2004 (CNS NEWS) Bill Richardson, Governor of New Mexico and Permanent Convention Chair of the Democratic National Convention, spoke from the Foreign Press Center in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday and linked foreign correspondents at the Foreign Press Center in New York live via Digital Video Conference, enabling him to take questions from participants in both cities.

“Stronger at Home, Respected in the World” is the theme of the Democratic National Convention that will be held in
Boston , Massachusetts from July 26 through July 29. “The 2004 Democratic Convention will tell the life stories of [presidential nominee] John Kerry and [vice presidential nominee] John Edwards…the story of their lifetime of service to the nation and fight for average Americans and their vision for a stronger and more secure America,” he said.  

The personable Richardson began his remarks speaking a sentence in French, then one in Spanish and jokingly thanking everyone for inviting him to this foreign language briefing.   

The convention will be a gathering for 4,353 delegates and 611 alternates.  Forty percent of the delegates represent minorities, making this the most diverse convention in party history. It will also be the “greeenest” [environmentally friendly] convention ever, powered by a variety of renewal sources, including wind, hydroelectric power, biomass, and solar energy.  

The Democrats are aiming their appeal toward the 18-33 age group as well as to Veterans, because of Kerry’s Vietnam service. Richardson said that the 14,000 volunteers mark an unprecedented number.  The message the Democrats hope to send is that Kerry is a proven, tested leader who can be trusted, especially in the national security arena.  

Each day of the DNC will have a theme. Monday, July 26 will be “Kerry-Edward’s Plan for America’s Future. Speakers will include former vice president Al Gore and former U.S. presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton.  Tuesday, July 27’s topic will be “A Lifetime of Strength and Service,” with an introduction by Kerry’s wife and a speech by Ted Kennedy. Wednesday, July 28 will feature “A Stronger, More Secure America.” Speakers, including Bill Richardson, will talk about foreign policy. Thursday, July 29 will look at “Stronger at Home, Respected in the World,” featuring Kerry’s family, his crewmates in Vietnam, and the Green Beret he rescued in Vietnam.  

Most sessions will be held from 3:00 P.M. to 11:00 P.M.  For both the Democratic and Republic conventions, primetime TV networks have limited their  coverage just three hours, which Richardson feels is insufficient.  

During the question and answer period of Tuesday’s briefing, Richardson said that 50 percent of the platform will be on national security issues, which the Democrats see as important in voter’s minds as domestic issues.  

Ron Reagan, son of the late U.S. President Ronald Reagan, a legendary pillar of the Republican Party, will speak on Tuesday to the Democratic National Convention on the importance of stem cell research. Richardson said that this is not a partisan issue and should not be treated as political—it is part of the search for the cure of diabetes and cancer.  

Richardson said that the Democratic Party is more sensitive to issues in Africa, Asia, Latin America, as well as to diplomacy, the environment, and respect for sovereignty. He feels that they have a stronger commitment to the rights of immigrants than the Republicans.  

Richardson said that despite Bush’s limitation on visits to Cuba and reduction of the amount of remittances that can be sent there, he will most likely carry the Florida Cuban vote. The Democrats will be aiming their message at the 20 percent of Floridians who are not Cuban-Americans.  

Richardson, an experienced diplomat on the international scene, said he felt Kerry has more respect for international alliances, including the United Nations, than the present administration.

He said that, for the first time, the American people are making foreign policy a priority, especially because of the Iraq issue.  

One reporter asked if Richardson would consider being Kerry’s Secretary of State. Richardson laughed and said, “I’m happy being Governor of New Mexico.” He said that after the briefing, he will fly back to Sante Fe, ride his horse, enjoy the sun, and be in a place where he won’t have to worry about traffic.  

Bill Richardson was a U.S. Congressman from 1983 to 1997. In February 1997 he was appointed as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, the first Hispanic to hold that position. From 1998-2001 he served as President Clinton’s secretary of energy.

 

 

 

The following is an excerpt from CNS News Caribbean Report published in May of 1999:

HIGHLIGHTS

OF

THE ROSENBORG

MISSION


COMPOSITION OF ROSENBORG MISSION TO HAITI

The composition of the Mission as finally constituted is shown below. The fields of special experience of the individual experts are broadly indicative of the particular aspects of the Haitian development problem assigned to the different members for study. All the members, however, were to work in close consultation with each other in contributing to the joint teamwork, and none was expected to report individually.

Members
Ansgar Rosenborg, Chief of the Mission, UnitedNation
William H. Dean, Secretary of the Mission, United Nations
William G. Casseres, expert in Agricultural Development, Food and Agriculture Organization

Carle Fritzle, expert in Tropical Agriculture, Food and Agriculture Organization

Ernest F. Thompson, expert in Development of Fisheries, Food and Agriculture Organization
Edwin R. Henson, expert in Combined Resource Development, United Nations
Adolfo Dorfman, expert in Industrial Development, United Nations
Alexander McLeod, expert in questions of Finance and Credit Organization, International 


Monetary Fund

Elba Gomez del Rey, expert in Public Finance, United Nation

Frederick J. Rex, expert in Fundamental Education, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization
Adolf Kundig, expert in Tropical Public Health Organization, World Health Organization
Una M. Russell, Administrative Assistant and Secretary to the Chief of the Mission, United Nations

MISSION TO HAITI  

The United Nations Mission of Technical Assistance to the Republic of Haiti deserves attention as a new departure in United Nations activities. Undertaken at the request of the Haitian Government under Economic and Social Council resolution 51 (IV) of26 March 1947, it gave impetus to General Assembly resolution 200 (III) of 4 December 1948, on Technical Assistance for Economic Development, deliberated on and finally adopted while the experts drawn from the United Nations Secretariat, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the World Health Organization were actively engaged in Haiti in investigation of the country's development problems. This Mission is in a sense a precursor of the ampler efforts which, it is hoped, the international organizations concerned will be enabled to display in realization of the bold programme of technical assistance to underdeveloped countries envisaged by the President of the United States, and the United Nations contribution to which will be discussed at the forthcoming session of the Economic and Social Council.  

The Mission having now submitted its report, the analysis and recommendations of which have been duly brought to the Haitian Government's attention, I have pleasure in making it public in full accord with the President of the Republic of Haiti.  

Trygve Lie, Lake Success June 1949

 

 

 

 

 

   

 
TRYGVE LIE, elected Secretary-General of the United Nations on February I, 1946.
(This photo was taken in Lake Success, New York, in August 1949.)


HIGHLIGHTS OF THE ROSENBORG MISSION

NATURE OF THE MISSION'S REPORT

The report as here presented is a product of team work incorporating the contributions furnished by the different experts in consultation with each other. In elaborating their contributions they have naturally taken advantage also of advice from others, and especially from fellow experts in the organizations to which they belong. While the findings, suggestions and recommendations here given represent the consolidated views of the Mission, it does not follow that they are necessarily endorsed in full detail by the various United Nations organs from which the members of the Mission were drawn. In other words, the members have served on the Mission primarily in their capacity of experts in the substantive fields covered by the Mission's investigations.

The Mission has set as its primary task to draw up, in the light of its examination of Haiti's economic conditions and relevant problems, a comprehensive and consistent framework, as it were, for the policy it advises the Government to apply in endeavoring to promote the economic development of the country. Within this general frame we propose various measures, in part of an organizational nature, designed to broaden the scope, hasten the pace, and increase the efficiency of the national developmental effort, and to ensure lasting beneficial results therefrom.

The review here given of conditions in the various fields to be taken in to consideration with reference to the over-all problem of Haiti’s economic development and the recommendations or suggestions made in the report relate to the situation found to obtain at the time of the Mission's sojourn in the country .

 HEADQUARTERS MISSION BASE

 

With the Mission headquarters at Port-au-Prince as a base, the members traveled extensively, in groups or individually, making field studies throughout the country .On these field trips they were accompanied by national specialists in the subject matters studied, who shared generously of their knowledge and ensured necessary local contacts. Living, working, and traveling together the experts of the Mission had the opportunity of continuous exchange of views and experience. Observations and conclusions were discussed

with a view to the framing of duly integrated recommendations concerning the difference aspects of the over-all problem studied by the Mission . The general lines of the joint report were laid down before the Mission returned to Lake Success toward the end of December.



 PROCEDURE FOR THE MISSION

In confining itself at this initial stage of United Nations technical assistance to Haiti to reviewing problems and conditions, formulating recommendations for policy guidance, and suggesting remedial measures, without entering into details of implementation, the Mission has kept in mind the desirability, not to say the necessity, ofHaiti's having recourse to continued expert assistance in the minute planning and execution of specific projects undertaken in accordance with the advice here proffered. The Mission wishes to draw the attention of the Haitian Government to the facilities for technical assistance in various forms which the Secretary- General of the United Nations is authorized under General Assembly resolution 200 (III) of 4 December 1948 to render (in fact on somewhat more liberal terms than those previously afforded by Economic and Social Council resolution 51 (IV) under which the Mission to Haiti has been operating) to Member Governments in need of such assistance. In addition, technical assistance in the substantive fields covered by the United Nations specialized agencies may be sought directly from these agencies.

The Mission has not engaged in cost estimates for particular development projects, and to attempt any "wholesale" estimate of the costs involved in an over-all programme of economic development of the country would obviously serve no particular purpose. On various points in our report we stress the necessity for the development effort, if it is to be lastingly successful, to rely in the fIrst instance on efficient utilization of the nation's own means. In view of the relative paucity of these means, however, recourse will have to be had to borrowing abroad for the financing of larger Government-sponsored development projects requiring sizable capital investment. It is for the Government to define such projects in precise detail and to decide where, and in what form, to seek the external capital needed. In undertaking projects requiring external financing it is particularly desirable and necessary to proceed by steps and with great circumspection, in order to allow the economy-strengthening results of first priority projects to take effect before adding new foreign debt commitments. Any foreign lender for specific development projects will obviously wish to make his own appraisal of the costs and credit- worthiness of the particular projects involved prior to risking his funds.


 

 

THE GENERAL SITUATION OF THE MISSION

The general situation as regards external trade and internal transport and communications would have to be taken into account in the over-all review of the country's economic development problem without provision at this initial stage of specialists on these questions, as considerations of the costs falling on the Haitian Government imposed certain limitations on the size of the Mission. Nor was any specialist on labour questions included in the team. As the Government had already had the benefit of advice on these matters from the International Labour Organization following a special mission to Haiti by an expert of the organization.

Some time in advance of the date set for the departure of the Mission the members gathered at United Nations Headquarters to study the documentation brought together and prepare the plan the work. The Mission proceeded in the middle of October to Haiti, where it spent two months 1 in intensive investigation of the development problems in the various economic and related fields.2

At this point the Mission wishes to express its great appreciation of the excellent arrangements made by the Haitian Government to aid in its task and co-operate actively in the investigation. For office purposed the Government placed at the Mission's disposal in Port-au-Prince a house adequately provided with equipment and supplies. In addition, the Government furnished to the Mission local secretarial staff and junior research assistants, while the senior officers of the various ministries and technical services readily assisted the Mission experts with information and advice. The Mission also wishes to record its gratitude to the Haitian Government for its solicitude for the personal comfort of the members of the team.

The Mission found great encouragement in the deep interest shown in its work by His Excellency Dumarsais Estime, President of the Republic of Haiti.  

 

1 Some of the members spent less than two months in Haiti. Mr. .Dorfman and Mr. .Thompson arrived somewhat later than the main party of the Mission, and Mr. Thompson concluded his work in Haiti a few days earlier than the other members. Mr. Casseres and Mr. Dorfman interrupted their Mission work for a brief interval each to attend to pressing duties at the F AO and United Nations headquarters. Brief trips to other countries of the region for technical consultations and study of solutions to development problems analogous to those confronting Haiti were made, with the Haitian Government's approval, by the Mission 's specialists in the fields of agriculture, fisheries, small industries, education, and credit organization. Most of these consultations took place in Puerto Rico, where special facilities graciously arranged by the United States Department of the Interior and the Insular Government of Puerto Rico were provided for the purpose.  

2 Valuable advice in the field of fisheries was obtained by the Mission from Mr. Mogens Jul, officer of the Fisheries Division of FAO, who visited Haiti briefly in November in connexion with his regular duties.

 

 

 


"Bouboule and members of "Nations and Cultures"

L’ECHEC
WHAT WILL BE HAITI’S FUTURE?


Fort Lauderdale, Florida, June 5, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

Popular broadcaster Serge Beaulieu, affectionately known as Bouboule, was the keynote speaker to a crowd of Floridian Haitians Saturday night at the Broward County Main Library in Fort Lauderdale. He asked the audience to explore with him l’échec Haiti ’s 200 years of failure.  

The three-hour conference also featured the poet Heraste Obas, who passionately expressed the hope that Haiti will not perish.  

Senagalese Professor Babacar M’Bow, who had just returned from a conference in Trinidad and Tobago, spoke de la memoire à l’histoire, stressing the importance of respecting one’s heritage.  

Wearing his signature bow tie and speaking in his mellifluous, deep, and penetrating voice, Bouboule asked: “Will Haiti survive? He said the land would always be there but wondered about the society as it exists today.  

After the slave revolt that won Haiti ’s independence in 1804 from Napoleon’s France , Haitian society saw the disappearance of the white conquistadors, while the mulattoes and the blacks managed to survive, even while distrusting each other.  

Most of the mulattoes maintained their wealth, educated their children in France, Switzerland, and Germany, and kept a European flavor on the island.  They built gourmet restaurants that served the finest French wines, established their own social clubs, and managed to be in charge of the government.  

In the late 1940s, Bouboule said, a social revolution began, which enabled the blacks, who had been living in abject poverty, to have aspirations of power. This movement was short-lived, but in 1957, Francois “Papa Doc” Duvalier appeared on Haiti ’s political scene with the goal of giving power to the masses. The Duvalier regime, father and son, lasted longer than previous ones but was mired in controversy. It was viewed askance by the international community, which was anxious to end the era of the caudillos, civil and military in Latin America . The Dominican Republic’s Trujillo , Nicaragua’s Somoza, and Haiti ’s Duvalier were targeted, and the communists had dreams of controlling the world.  

After the fall of the Duvaliers in Haiti , the brief period of relative calm that emerged was suddenly reversed by another type of government: the ochlocracy. The populista, the masses, overwhelmingly embraced the message of a young, activist priest, Jean Bertrand Aristide, whom they nicknamed “Titid” and viewed as a savior.  

But, in less than one year, the military reacted and Titid was overthrown. He went into exile, first in Venezuela , then to Paris , and finally found a niche in Washington , where he was able to meet with the most powerful of America ’s political elite, including the Clintons and the Kennedys. After two years, Titid, with the help of 20,000 U.S. Marines, was able to return to Haiti , where he resumed the presidency. But his tenure did not fulfill the people’s expectations, and he was at odds with the mulatto class. The fight ended the same way—but this time with the American power overthrowing him. The vacuum was quickly filled with American-backed individuals, who today don’t seem to know what Haiti ’s future will be.  

Within that thumbnail historical context, Bouboule questioned the future of Haiti and the coexistence of the two societies: mulatto and black. Titid left Haiti with the masses poorer, disillusioned, and more desperate than they had ever been. Unfortunately, for the first time in the country’s history, the masses had destroyed century-old institutions, such as the historical cathedral of Port-au-Prince where Haiti ’s great hero Toussaint L’Ouverture spoke. On February 29 this year, when Aristide’s overthrow was known, the masses burned to the ground banks and homes and ransacked established businesses. Without a quick intervention once again by the U.S. Marines, that trend would have continued until today.  

Now, while 8,000 United Nations troops are in the process of arriving in Haiti , some of the country’s provinces are not under the U.S.-backed government control. Bouboule questioned the extent of the hate of the masses for the other part of the society. Time constraints prevented a deep analysis, but it seems that both historically and now the political leaders have been interested in taking the power—not in improving the country or the well-being of its people. The warning bell in Bouboule’s urgent message was that, unless something changes, in the future, the two societies may not be able to coexist.  

The audience seemed to agree with his points il faut comprendre avant d’apprendre (It is necessary to understand before one can learn) and that there is a difference between le dire and le faire (saying and doing).  

Bouboule said that the future of Haiti is in the hands of the youth and that they have to be taught how to steer the ship.  

The seminar, sponsored by “Nations and Cultures,” was a celebration of its first anniversary on radio in southern Florida . The organizing committee included Jean-Rony Monestime, Fritz Obas, Felix Norvilien, Francelet Fileus, Samson Myrtil, and Henri-C.K.P. It was a night to remember.  

 

 

 

 

 


Serge Beaulieu "Bouboule"

L’ECHEC
WHAT WILL BE HAITI ’S FUTURE?


Fort Lauderdale, Florida, June 5, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

Popular broadcaster Serge Beaulieu, affectionately known as Bouboule, was the keynote speaker to a crowd of Floridian Haitians Saturday night at the Broward County Main Library in Fort Lauderdale. He asked the audience to explore with him l’échec Haiti ’s 200 years of failure.  

The three-hour conference also featured the poet Heraste Obas, who passionately expressed the hope that Haiti will not perish.  

Senagalese Professor Babacar M’Bow, who had just returned from a conference in Trinidad and Tobago, spoke de la memoire à l’histoire, stressing the importance of respecting one’s heritage.  

Wearing his signature bow tie and speaking in his mellifluous, deep, and penetrating voice, Bouboule asked: “Will Haiti survive? He said the land would always be there but wondered about the society as it exists today.  

After the slave revolt that won Haiti ’s independence in 1804 from Napoleon’s France , Haitian society saw the disappearance of the white conquistadors, while the mulattoes and the blacks managed to survive, even while distrusting each other.  

Most of the mulattoes maintained their wealth, educated their children in France, Switzerland, and Germany, and kept a European flavor on the island.  They built gourmet restaurants that served the finest French wines, established their own social clubs, and managed to be in charge of the government.  

In the late 1940s, Bouboule said, a social revolution began, which enabled the blacks, who had been living in abject poverty, to have aspirations of power. This movement was short-lived, but in 1957, Francois “Papa Doc” Duvalier appeared on Haiti ’s political scene with the goal of giving power to the masses. The Duvalier regime, father and son, lasted longer than previous ones but was mired in controversy. It was viewed askance by the international community, which was anxious to end the era of the caudillos, civil and military in Latin America . The Dominican Republic’s Trujillo , Nicaragua’s Somoza, and Haiti ’s Duvalier were targeted, and the communists had dreams of controlling the world.  

After the fall of the Duvaliers in Haiti , the brief period of relative calm that emerged was suddenly reversed by another type of government: the ochlocracy. The populista, the masses, overwhelmingly embraced the message of a young, activist priest, Jean Bertrand Aristide, whom they nicknamed “Titid” and viewed as a savior.  

But, in less than one year, the military reacted and Titid was overthrown. He went into exile, first in Venezuela , then to Paris , and finally found a niche in Washington , where he was able to meet with the most powerful of America ’s political elite, including the Clintons and the Kennedys. After two years, Titid, with the help of 20,000 U.S. Marines, was able to return to Haiti , where he resumed the presidency. But his tenure did not fulfill the people’s expectations, and he was at odds with the mulatto class. The fight ended the same way—but this time with the American power overthrowing him. The vacuum was quickly filled with American-backed individuals, who today don’t seem to know what Haiti ’s future will be.  

Within that thumbnail historical context, Bouboule questioned the future of Haiti and the coexistence of the two societies: mulatto and black. Titid left Haiti with the masses poorer, disillusioned, and more desperate than they had ever been. Unfortunately, for the first time in the country’s history, the masses had destroyed century-old institutions, such as the historical cathedral of Port-au-Prince where Haiti ’s great hero Toussaint L’Ouverture spoke. On February 29 this year, when Aristide’s overthrow was known, the masses burned to the ground banks and homes and ransacked established businesses. Without a quick intervention once again by the U.S. Marines, that trend would have continued until today.  

Now, while 8,000 United Nations troops are in the process of arriving in Haiti , some of the country’s provinces are not under the U.S.-backed government control. Bouboule questioned the extent of the hate of the masses for the other part of the society. Time constraints prevented a deep analysis, but it seems that both historically and now the political leaders have been interested in taking the power—not in improving the country or the well-being of its people. The warning bell in Bouboule’s urgent message was that, unless something changes, in the future, the two societies may not be able to coexist.  

The audience seemed to agree with his points il faut comprendre avant d’apprendre (It is necessary to understand before one can learn) and that there is a difference between le dire and le faire (saying and doing).  

Bouboule said that the future of Haiti is in the hands of the youth and that they have to be taught how to steer the ship.  

The seminar, sponsored by “Nations and Cultures,” was a celebration of its first anniversary on radio in southern Florida . The organizing committee included Jean-Rony Monestime, Fritz Obas, Felix Norvilien, Francelet Fileus, Samson Myrtil, and Henri-C.K.P. It was a night to remember.  

 

 

                                 

 

 

 

CNS NEWS

swissinfo-Actualité Internationale

 

 

CNS NEWS HAITI

Fort-Lauderdale, Le 05 Mai 2004  

Sénateur Serge Beaulieu
En ses Bureaux  

                                    Objet:  Invitation  

M. le Sénateur,  

            Dans le dessein de célèbrer son premier anniversaire sur les ondes et au service de la communauté haitienne du sud de la Floride, “Nations et Cultures” organisera une recontre le Samedi 05 juin 2004, baptisée  “rendez-vous avec l’histoire”.  

            En effet, le comité d’organisation, sous légide d’un plan stratégique, vous a choisi comme “conférencier d’honneur”.  Et, il espère votre allocution sera sur “l’échec”.  

            A noter que votre choix constitue le symbole du respect que les jeunes étudiants haitiens voudraient montrer á l’égard de ceux qui prêchent au quotidian l’unité de la famille haitienne.  

            Espérant que cette invitation sera appréciée, le comité d’organisation vous prie, M. le sénateur et diplomate de carrière, d’agréer l’expression de ses remerciments les plus patriotiques.  

Pour le comité:  

[signé]

Jean-Rony Andre M. Sec. Gal             Fritz Obas, Cons.             Henri-C.K.P., Tresor  

 

 

Gerard Latortue, interim Prime Minister of Haiti speaks to the press after a meeting at the US State Department with Secretary of State Colin Powell in Washington, DC(AFP/Tim Sloan)
Gerard Latortue, interim Prime Minister of Haiti

LATORTUE AT THE U.N.—“ARISTIDE IS BEHIND US”

By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief  

United Nations, New York, May 10, 2004 (CNS NEWS)

On Monday morning, after a 30-minute meeting reviewing the forthcoming U.N. Mission to Haiti with U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Gerard Latortue, Haiti’s Interim Prime Minister, approached the Security Council stakeout to meet the press. One of the first questions, of course, was about former president Jean Bertrand Aristide. Latortue said, “Aristide is behind us.” The big problem, he said, is how to make Haiti go forward. In that respect, he said, he was counting on the international community to provide the kind of assistance that his country will need. He did not want to discuss figures, since his committee working on development matters had not yet provided its report.  

Looking jovial and smiling, Latortue indicated he hoped that pretty soon they will be able to provide security throughout the country’s 18,000 square kilometers in order to organize elections. He indicated, however, that Aristide, before leaving, had distributed 50,000 guns to his supporters throughout the country.   

As far as the 14-country members of Caricom that refused to recognize Latortue’s government, he said that this question is also behind him, as he had explained in a speech before the Organization of American States in Washington last week. However, he said that he had asked the U.N. Secretary-General to use his good offices to settle the dispute.  

Speaking in both French and English, Haiti’s Prime Minister made sure that all questions were answered, including the participation of the former government in drug-related activities. He indicated that this interim government will make sure that the police, instead of being participants in the drug business, will cooperate fully with the Drug Enforcement Agency.  

The question of the hunt for Arisitide’s hidden treasury did not come up, but Latortue mentioned that he is going to Paris on Tuesday to meet President Chirac and then on to Brussels.  

Latortue said that the question of the revival of Haiti’s Armed Forces is of low priority as far as he is concerned, stating that “this is an interim government. Although we have created a commission to study to matter, this will be left to the elected government.”  

Roland Dumas, Special Advisor of the Secretary-General of the United Nations, said afterward that he hoped the best for the government of Latortue and that he hoped the Caricom countries would take the necessary steps to recognize this government. Dumas, who is from Trinidad , referred to a statement by that country’s foreign minister indicating that questions concerning Caricom were not in Dumas’s purview. Dumas said that he still feels that his job as Special Advisor to the Secretary-General is to talk about these matters.

 

 

South Africa gives ex-Haitian leader Aristide a temporary home
Photo
 

 

 

 

 

 

AFTER US, IT WILL BE US
APRE NOU, CE NOU


By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief  

United Nations, New York, May 1, 2004, (CNS NEWS)

If U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan had his own way, he would ask for a 10-year mission to Haiti. His special advisor, Trinidadian Roland Dumas, went even further and asked for 20 years.  The Security Council, however, decided Friday on a 6-month period, with advance assurance that the mission would be renewed.  

A decade ago, the Security Council gave the Clinton Administration carte blanche for an invasion of Haiti with 20,000 U.S. Marines to return Jean Bertrand Aristide to power and install democracy in the world’s first black republic. On January 29 of this year, the same Marines were called upon to remove Jean Bertrand Aristide and send him back into exile at a place which, still today, is undetermined.  

Nobody blamed either the United States’ administration or the United Nations. Everyone blamed Haiti. Some U.S. officials are convinced that the Haitians cannot run their own country—something they’ve been saying for two centuries.  Kofi Annan seems to echo that sentiment. Today, French troops patrol the soil of Haiti precisely in the town where 200 years ago they were defeated and Haiti gained her independence from Napoleon.

So, what has happened to Haiti’s glory and the Haitians? During the country’s 200 years of history, the Haitian elite were considered brilliant, crisscrossing the entire world with their finesse and sophistication. They attended the finest European schools and graduated with excellent marks. Some of them worked abroad in financial institutions, and, at the United Nations, they cooperated in the building of emerging Africa. Former U.N. Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjold even appointed a Haitian, Max Dorsainville, as his personal representative to the Congo in the tumultuous 1960s. Not long ago, another former U.N. secretary-general, Boutros Boutros Ghali, chose a Haitian as his chief of staff.  

When it comes to managing the affairs of their own country, however, the results are always negative. A Haitian proverb: apre nou, ce nou (meaning: “after us, it will be us”) has always been put into application—with the same result. The Haitian masses have remained in the same misery they experienced under French slavery.  

In 1957, Francois “Papa Doc” Duvalier introduced a new system of government, where the middle class replaced the power traditionally occupied by the country’s mulatto elite. Although a change was made in the structure of command of the country’s affairs, the actual situation did not change that much, except, for a blink in time, the elite had to stand by and watch the middle class in overall charge.  

The departure of the Duvaliers created a vacuum that a popular priest from the slums, Father Aristide, quickly and easily filled. For a while, there was hope that there would be a change in the societal structure of Haiti. But the fighting between the elite and the masses had become so entrenched, observers realized that the more things changed, the more they remained the same. Finally, the Americans decided overnight to get rid of Aristide, without preparing a transition. Today’s Haiti appears to be at the beginning of a huge turmoil, which is going to divide the country even further.  

Haiti’s current government is creating the problem itself. The Constitution states that, in order to avoid chaos, elections must be held no later than 90 days from the takeover of a new government in situations such as the current one. But this government (nobody knows where it came from) has decided that it needs two years before holding an election. Only another month remains to fulfill the spirit of the Constitution. In the meantime, massive dismissal of Aristide’s people in governmental positions has already begun. Some of them have gone into hiding, in fear for their lives.  

The Security Council seemingly could care less about a true reconciliation in Haiti. It approved Kofi Annan’s April 16, 2004 report, which went so far as to say that Haiti’s new president was “sworn in as interim President, in accordance with the constitutional rules of succession” – an assumption which is not correct.  However, the Security Council apparently considers its mission accomplished, just like the first time when it sent the 20,000 U.S. Marines to return Aristide to power. In fact, Lakhdar Brahimi, who is making headlines today, was rewarded with positions as U.N. Special Representative to Afghanistan and then to Iraq for having done a superb job Haiti.  

Haitians, however, are not strangers to the destruction of their own country. A so-called elite in Haiti still considers themselves the beneficiaries of the slavery system, looking at the masses as an instrument to exploit. They live well, their children are well educated abroad, and they represent all the foreign companies doing business in Haiti. Haiti for them is paradise.  

On the other hand, you have the masses, who are tired of being exploited, dying of hunger, poverty, and disease. On a grand scale, nobody seems to care. On a smaller scale, however, Protestant churches have been erected all over the country, sometimes with medical dispensaries attached. Their mother churches in the United States support them. Some of the missionaries are former prisoners who found God and were sent to the island for rehabilitation. Overall, they comport themselves well, with very few scandals. Even the Mormon Church has tried over the years to save the souls of the Haitians, but their attempt at conversion has not had a high success rate. Only the heir to part of the famous Mellon fortune, the late Larry Mellon and his wife, Gwen, created a big project simply to help the masses. Unfortunately, their Albert Schweitzer Hospital built in Deschapelles, in Haiti’s Artibonite Valley, has deteriorated since their deaths.  

Haitians are still suspicious of foreigners, because of deep memories of slavery, but today they are too weak to fight. After the departure of their leader, Jean Bertrand Aristide, they no longer believe in anyone but await the arrival of the Messiah.  

Ten years, twenty years of a United Nations peacekeeping force will do what? Nothing. It is not the Brazilian troops who are going to “civilize” the Haitians. They know it, and the Haitians know it. Apre nou, ce nou (after us, it will be us). Citing this Haitian proverb, the people know that life will continue with hopelessness and misery. But, as it always has, Haiti will survive and the blancs will leave.

 

 

 

CNS NEWS HAITI


Boniface Alexandre, acting President of Haiti

U.N. REPORT FANTASIZES CONSTITUTIONAL LEGITIMACY OF HAITI ”S NEW INTERIM PRESIDENT

By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief  

United Nations, New York , April 23, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  
Controversy continues over the departure on February 29 of Jean Bertrand Aristide from power in the impoverished island country of Haiti amid allegations of kidnapping in the middle of the night by the U.S. ambassador in Port-au-Prince , accompanied by U.S. Marines.  

In a phone interview with CNN from his then place of exile in the Central African Republic , a defiant Aristide said point blank that he was forced at gun point to board a chartered U.S. government plane, not knowing where he was headed, after being told by a U.S. official that he was going to meet the press. That statement created turmoil, provoking a delegation of the U.S. Congressional Black Caucus to travel to Bangui , capital of the Central African Republic , to take Aristide to Jamaica , where he was given temporary asylum.  

The U.S. administration responded that Aristide did resign and left the country voluntarily. Aristide’s own prime minister, Yvon Neptune, said that he had a letter of resignation from his president.  And, at the United Nations, Aristide’s ambassador, Jean Alexandre, introduced a letter before the Security Council from the president of Haiti ’s Supreme Court, Boniface Alexander, acting as interim president, requesting immediate assistance from the U.N., which was granted.  Yet, a few days earlier the Council ignored a similar request by Aristide.   

Dealing with a presidential vacancy, Article 149 of the Haitian Constitution authorizes the president of the Supreme Court to become president after taking oath of office before a joint session of Parliament (the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate). His only mandate is to organize general elections in no more than 90 days. 

Although the terms of the members of the Chamber of Deputies had expired, the Senate, nevertheless, continued to function permanently, according to Article 95-1 of the Constitution. Boniface Alexandre could have requested advice from the president of the Senate, who is also president of the Assemblee National  (Parliament) on how to solve the matter. According to the President of the Senate, Senator Yvon Feuille, “Nobody asked me, although I was present as a guest at the investiture ceremony at the National Palace .”  

How did Boniface Alexandre become president? The United States and the international community decided to improvise an unprecedented scenario, outside of the Constitution of Haiti, by designating a tripartite council consisting of one representative each from Famni Lavalas Party and the Plate-forme Democratique, and a United Nations Development Program staff member representing the international community. This group selected seven so-called eminent persons, known as the Conseil des sages, unknown in Haitian tradition. On March 9 this Conseil des sages selected Gerard Latortue, a former employee of UNIDO, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization, as prime minister.  

In the meantime, Boniface Alexandre took the oath of office at the National Palace in front of those high dignitaries.  

On April 16, 2004 , the U.N. Secretary-General introduced a 34-page report before the Security Council on the political situation in Haiti . Depicting the events of February 29, the report said: “Early on 29 February, Mr. Aristide left the country. His letter of resignation was read out by the Prime Minister, Yvon Neptune. Within hours, Boniface Alexandre, the President of the Supreme Court, was sworn in as interim President, in accordance with the constitutional rules of succession.”  

When the Spokesman’s office was called to explain the phrase “in accordance with the constitutional rules of succession,” they contacted the Peace Keeping Operation  (PKO) who said that they meant it was in accordance with Article 149.  Haitian constitutional scholars disagree, maintaining that Boniface Alexandre’s presidency is not in conformity with Haiti ’s constitutional rule of succession, also citing Article 149. Furthermore, they say, on February 29, he did not have—and still does not have—the legal authority to request from the U.N. Security Council the expedition of troops to that island.  

Meanwhile, a humanitarian flash appeal for US $35 million by the United Nations and its partners has raised only US $7 million. 

 

 

CARICOM’S DIPLOMATIC BUNGLE

By Serge Beaulieu
UN Bureau Chief  

United Nations, April 13, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

The fourteen countries of Caricom did not even exist when the Monroe Doctrine was enacted in 1823 to protect the interests of the United States against the intrusion of European powers in the affairs of America .  Haiti was already an independent country but continued to suffer the humiliation of the European powers with a powerful United States averting its eyes.   

France, England, Italy – even Germany – continued to ransom Haitian ports in dispute with a weak Haitian nation. It took the United States more than 30 years before recognizing Haiti as an independent country.  Nevertheless, Haiti has survived, and, hopefully, will continue to survive.  

With the United Nations decolonization movement in the 1960s came the independence of the British Caribbean islands. They were quick to unify under a treaty to form a trade association in 1973 that they called Caricom. This trade association evolved to become a political body that requested to participate in the Organization of American States (OAS), the regional organization, and as a block at the United Nations as well.  

For several years they ignored Haiti, one of the largest countries in the Caribbean, until the creation of the ACP (the Africa, Caribbean, Pacific Group of States).  Spain, one of the major European donor countries, indicated it was interested in helping to finance Caribbean development as a whole, not just the former British Caribbean islands. Haiti was accepted as a full member, while the Dominican Republic was invited to participate in some capacity.  

The arrival of Jean Bertrand Aristide as Haiti’s head of state was a way for Caricom to expand its membership and speak as an inclusive Caribbean organization. It is in that light that when President Aristide was overthrown, or, as Aristide alleges, kidnapped, Caricom found itself in a delicate situation to intervene for one of its leaders. The situation could have remained there if Jamaica’s Prime Minister Patterson had not decided to offer hospitality to the deposed Haitian president from his place of temporary exile in the Central African Republic.  Patterson’s invitation, and Aristide’s acceptance, provoked a hasty reaction from Haiti’s US-designated prime minister, Gerard Latortue, who recalled the country’s ambassador from Jamaica and cut relations with Caricom.  

Patterson, taken by surprise by this reaction, decided to submit the question at the forthcoming Caricom Heads of State meeting in St. Kitts in March. The Caricom Heads of State, in turn, decided to withhold recognition of the US-backed Latortue government and requested a meeting of the United Nations General Assembly to discuss Aristide’s allegation that he was kidnapped at gunpoint by the US ambassador and a group of Marines and put in a US plane bound to nowhere, until he recognized that he was in the Central African Republic.  

The investigation requested by the Caricom Heads of State was approved by the 52 countries of the African Union. So far, nyet.  An adviser named by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Reginald Dumas of Trinidad, expressed surprise at Caricom’s delay in lodging its request for the probe, sparking a tiff with the Trinidad and Tobago foreign Minister, Kwolson Gift. Gift said he was doubtful of Dumas’ justification for his observation, since the investigation called for by Caricom was not within his purview.  

Meanwhile, last Monday, US Secretary of State Colin Powell landed in Haiti’s capital city Port-au-Prince to offer support and legitimacy to Latortue’s government.  

At the United Nations, Deputy Secretary-General Louise Frechette, in opening remarks to a meeting in New York between representatives of Caricom and the UN system, said that the UN is seeking to draw in all relevant actors and pursue a common strategic aim in Haiti.  

“We will explore with Caricom, as well as with the OAS, what each of us is best positioned to contribute, in cooperation with our Haitian partners,” she said. “And since Caricom, the OAS, and the UN system will remain in Haiti long after the peacekeeping phase ends, we need to ensure that an integrated and common approach is followed.”  

Looking at the broader issues facing the Caribbean region, the Deputy Secretary-General noted that one of the main areas of collaboration between the UN and Caricom is trade, particularly the joint effort to press for greater liberalization and an international trading system that brings development gains for the bloc’s countries.  

Frechette’s presentation did not include mention of Caricom’s request for a General Assembly probe into Aristide’s allegations, and US Secretary of State Colin Powell has said that such a probe would serve no useful purpose. Has the matter simply died? Although the president of the General Assembly is the representative of St. Lucia, a Caribbean country, backed by 52 African members of the AU, it appears that without the okay of the United States no group can convene the General Assembly.

 

 

 

 

 

Caricom Heads of Government Withhold Recognition
of Haiti’s U.S.-Backed Latortue Regime  

March 27, 2004 (CNS NEWS)

By Serge Beaulieu  

During a two-day meeting in Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis, Caribbean Community (Caricom) heads of government decided to withhold recognition of the U.S.-backed Latortue/Boniface regime of Haiti.  

On February 29, Jean Bertrand Aristide was toppled from power and sent into exile in the Central African Republic by what he later called a kidnapping by U.S. agents under instructions from U.S. Ambassador to Haiti James Foley.  The U.S. Administration categorically denied Aristide’s version of events, stating that he resigned of his own free will and was provided with a plane to give him safe transport out of the country. They added that by so doing the U.S. saved his life, which had been threatened by internal insurrection.  What was supposed to be a simple transition of power became marred with controversy and conflicting versions.  

Under the Haitian Constitution, in a vacuum of power, two articles—Article 148 or Article 149—must apply.  Neither one was used.  Article 148 calls for the prime minister to assume the executive power until clarification of the president’s status.  Article 149 calls for the president of the Supreme Court—with the consent of Congress—to assume power and organize elections within 45 to 90 days.  

The dilemma in Haiti is that there is no sitting Congress.  But, after the departure of Aristide, someone decided that Boniface Alexandre, President of Haiti’s Supreme Court, could assume the presidency anyway. In addition, in the middle of the night a quick meeting of the U.N. Security Council was held at the request of the United States, where Aristide’s ambassador himself presented a letter from Boniface Alexandre as president of Haiti requesting troops to be sent to his country right away. The Council unanimously voted on a resolution to send the troops. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan became further involved by authorizing a member of the United Nations Development Program to create a tripartite council, on which he—a foreigner—would serve, to designate seven “wise men” to name a prime minister. It was as if Haiti were an African country without any tradition of government. What an insult.  But Haitians, in their quest to get rid of Aristide, accepted it anyway.  

Haiti is without a constitutional government, and its former president is currently in Jamaica, just 130 miles from the shores of his homeland. The U.S., France, and the U.N. appear to have been caught in an international conspiracy against Jean Bertrand Aristide, who stills holds the card of legitimacy. It is under these circumstances that a threatened Caricom organization met under heavy pressure from the U.S., France, and the U.N. to reject Aristide’s pretension and even expel him from Jamaica.  

Nevertheless, Caricom decided courageously to withhold recognition of the U.S.-backed Latortue/Boniface government. But for how long can one confront the world’s sole superpower?  The Caribbean countries never had to live under the Monroe Doctrine, but they may be well aware of the Bush doctrine: Those who are not with us are against us and must face the consequences.  

Bypassing the U.N. Security Council, Caricom has called for the U.N. General Assembly to investigate the circumstances surrounding Aristide’s departure from Haiti. Caricom is hoping for the support of the African Union in this matter.  

In the meantime, Jean Bertrand Aristide is in limbo in Jamaica.

 



Only through a long-term commitment to help [Haiti] can stability and prosperity be assured. Half-hearted efforts of the past have been insufficient. We cannot afford to fail this time.

Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Ottawa, Canada, 9 March 2004

 

HAITI —
GOVERNMENT, BUT NO GOVERNING LAW YET

By Serge Beaulieu
UN Bureau Chief  

United Nations, New York, March 19, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

In their rush to overthrow the constitutionally elected government of Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the French and the Americans forgot that there must be a governing law in place in order for the country to function. In less than a week they created a bizarre form of government, which has nothing to do with the tradition of the country.  

A council of “wise men” substituted itself for the national sovereignty and chose a man to form a government, under which law no one knows. This act alone abolished the Constitution of 1987, which had, until then, been the fundamental law of the country. Nobody dares to say it.  

Ministers have been designated and sworn in before their ministries were even created. There are no internal rules governing those ministries while the prime minister is making statements and decisions affecting the country. For example, he announced the breaking of relations with Jamaica and suspension of Haiti ’s participation in Caricom affairs. Normally, the Constitution of 1987 reserved this prerogative for the president of the republic. But who knows? The new prime minister may now be in charge of the country’s external affairs.  

In the meantime, Herard Abraham, a former general of what was called the defunct Haitian army, has been designated as minister of the interior and has announced publicly that he is going to institute a commission to reinstate the army, since that institution is still an integral part of the Haitian Constitution. But which Constitution is he referring to, since the government is not a product of any governing law?  

In the past, when a de facto regime took over the power, the Constitution was abolished immediately until further consideration. But this regime is simultaneously playing both a de facto and a constitutional role. At the United Nations, the spokesman for Kofi Annan is a little more cautious, repeating that there is no parliament in Haiti to ratify those officials. In the meantime, a defiant Aristide, who is visiting Jamaica,  calls himself the constitutional president of Haiti, creating a dilemma for the international community.  

Where do we go from here? Massive humanitarian assistance appears to be the key for bringing the world, including a nervous Caribbean and Latin American community, to accept the fact that superpowers can jump in the middle of the night with their troops, overthrow a constitutional government that they did not like, and create a de facto regime, placing their man in power--without impunity--as the caudillos used to do.  

Fourteen heads of state of the Caribbean Community, known as Caricom, recognizing their weakness nevertheless called for an investigation of the incident by the UN Secretary General. Hiding behind the Security Council, which had manipulated the whole incident, the Secretary-General ignored their request. Once again, Haiti has made history by offering the stage for reversing the general rule of one-man one vote, the fundamental basis of democracy.

 

UN Flash Appeal for Humanitarian Assistance to Haiti Appealing ...

 

HAITI/UN SMORGASBORD

By Serge Beaulieu
UN Bureau Chief  

United Nations, March 7, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

It all started on February 26 when the foreign minister of Jamaica urgently convened the UN Security Council to ask help for the crumbling government of Haiti ’s Jean Bertrand Aristide. All fifteen countries of Caricom, including Haiti , made a request for a multinational force to reestablish order. More than 30 speakers participated in the debate, which ended with a Presidential Statement asking both parties to refrain from violence.  It was obvious that the United States and France, the main players, did not want an intervention at that time.  

On February 29, the world learned, astonishingly, that Jean Bertrand Aristide had resigned and left Haiti in the hands of a relatively unknown Supreme Court judge, Boniface Alexandre.  An urgent meeting was called by the United States and France to again study the same request for the expedition of a multinational force.  This time, the request came from the new Haitian president.  A resolution was submitted and adopted unanimously to send a multinational force to Haiti in order to protect the Alexandre government.  

“Coup de Theatre” –

From the Central African Republic , President Aristide made an urgent call to CNN to say that Marines from the US Embassy had kidnapped him and put him on a plane, not knowing his final destination.  The US reacted at the highest government level by stating that Aristide had resigned without any pressure. Aristide then called his friends in the United States to protest the action.  Members of the Congressional Black Caucus intervened directly by presenting the case to Kofi Annan.  Caribbean heads of state, some of whom had spoken with Aristide, gathered in Kingston to issue a protest and call for an investigation by the United Nations.  As of this writing, Boniface Alexandre has been sworn in, but no one knows before whom, since Article 149 of the Constitution of Haiti states that it must be done before the Haitian Parliament, which does not exist at this time.  

A group of former soldiers from the disbanded army and Aristide’s police finally reached Port-au-Prince , where they are facing the American troops and the multinational force who are asking that they lay down their arms. In the meantime, the UNDP representative in Haiti , Adama Guindo, along with Leslie Voltaire, member of Aristide’s Lavalas party, and Paul Denis, member of the opposition group, chose a panel of seven “wise” people to name a prime minister. This is a complete departure from the Haitian Constitution.   

Aristide continues to maintain that he is the legitimate president of Haiti . More than 5,000 of his followers marched in the streets of capital city Port-au-Prince to demand his return. No one knows for sure the conditions under which Jean Bertrand Aristide is living in Bangui , capital of the Central African Republic . Aristide is being quoted as having accused France of collusion with the US in the alleged coup to remove him from office.

 

Procès-Verbal de la réunion du Counseil Tripartite

Le Processus Politique Décisionnel

(Texte Consolidé)

(Ce processus doit se dérouler dans les meilleurs délais, une semaine au maximum en tout.)

I : Le Conseil Tripartite

Les membres du Conseil sont nommés par le Gouvernement d’Haïti, la Plate-forme Démocratique et la communauté internationale. Ils auront à choisir par consensus et dans les meilleurs délais les sept membres du Conseil des Sages qui, à leur tour, choisiront le candidat pour le poste de Premier Ministre. Le processus décisionnel à part, le Conseil établit ses propres procédures.

Une personne membre de ce Conseil ne pourra faire partie du Conseil des Sages.

Le Conseil terminera son travail par la nomination des membres du Conseil des Sages.

II : Le Conseil des Sages

Le Conseil des Sages, largement représentatif des divers courants dans le pays, est choisi par le Conseil Tripartite. Il est composé de sept personnes. Les membres du Conseil des Sages seront des personnes de grande intégrité morale, reconnues pour leur expérience professionnelle, leur dévouement à la chose publique, provenant de divers secteurs socio-économiques et religieux, et qui représentent les différentes orientations politiques de la société haïtienne. Le Conseil établit ses propres procédures.

Une personne membre du Conseil des Sages ne pourra pas être nommée au poste de Premier Ministre.

Ce Conseil a pour tâche primaire de présenter au Président provisoire une candidature pour le poste de Premier Ministre.

Comme tâche secondaire, le Conseil sera consulté par le Premier Ministre dans le choix de son Cabinet.

 

III : Le Premier Ministre

Le Premier ministre est une personne neutre et indépendante, qui jouit de la confiance du public. Il est nommé par le Président provisoire sur la base de la candidature présentée par le Conseil des Sages. Le Président provisoire procède à la nomination dès réception de la candidature du Conseil des Sages.

Ce Premier Ministre ne pourra pas faire partie du gouvernement issu des prochaines élections.

IV : Le Cabinet

Le Cabinet est choisi par le Premier Ministre en consultation avec le Conseil des Sages et en accord avec le Président provisoire.

Les membres de ce Cabinet ne pourront pas faire parti du gouvernement issu des prochaines élections. 

Le 4 mars 2004

 

 

Lettre datee du 29 fevrier 2004, adressee au President du Conseil de securite par le Representant permanent d'Haiti aupres de l'Organisation des Nations Unies

       
J'ai l'honneur d'appeler votre attention sur une lettre du President de la Republique d'Haiti, S. E. M. Boniface Alexandre.

        Je vous serais oblige de bien vouloir faire distribuer le texte de la presente lettre et de son annexe comme document du Conseil de securite.

                                                            Le Representant permanent d'Haiti
                                                aupres de l'Organisation des Nations Unies
                                                                        (Signe) Jean Alexandre

 

 

Annexe a la lettre datee du 29 fevrier 2004, adressee au President du Conseil de securite par le Representant permanent d'Haiti aupres de l'Organisation des Nations Unies

        En ma qualite de President constitutionnel de la Republique d'Haiti, je lance un appel aux gouvernements de pays amis pour qu'ils soutiennent de toute urgence le processus pacifique et constitutionnel qui a commence a se derouler dans mon pays.

        A cette fin, j'autorise les forces de securite a entrer sur le territoire de la Republique d'Haiti et a y operer pour executer des activites visant a instaurer un climat de securite et de stabilite qui soutiendra le processus politique en cours, facilitera la fourniture de l'assistance humanitaire et aidera de maniere generale le peuple haitien.

                                                            (Signe) Boniface Alexandre

 

Communique de Presse   01/2004

                La Mission Permanente de la Republique Centrafricaine aupres des Nations Unies a l'honneur de faire tenir ci-joint, pour information, le texte du Communique Presidentiel diffuse suite a l'accueil reserve au President Jean-Bertrand ARISTIDE sur le territoire centrafricain.

                                                                        New York, le 2 Mars 2004

 

COMMUNIQUE PRESIDENTIEL

La Republique Centrafricaine est un pays de paix.  Le Berceau des Bantous, selon la formule du President fondateur de notre pays, Barthelemy BOGANDA, a toujours ete une terre d'accueil et d'hospitalite ou l'etranger de passage trouve le gite et le couvert.

La Republique Centrafricaine cultive egalement une tradition de dignite, dignite et respect de la personne humaine. C'est la patrie du <<ZO KWE ZO>>.

C'est imbu de cette philosophie et de nos valeurs ancestrales que le President de la Republique, Chef de l'Etat, le General de Division Francois BOZIZE pose ce jour un acte historique et de portee mondiale.  En effet, a la demande de son frere et aine, Doyen des chefs d'Etat d'Afrique centrale, Son Excellence El Hadj Omar BONGO ODIMBA, Le President de la Republique a accepte de recevoir et d'accueillir l'ancien President, de la toute premiere Republique noire du monde, Haiti, Monsieur Jean Bertrand ARISTIDE.

En cette periode de transition consensuelle et devant cette lourde responsabilite mais egalement devant ce devoir de citoyen et d'officier general, le Chef de l'Etat a pris le soin d'informer les principaux acteurs de ladite Transition, a savoir le Vice-President de la Republique, le Premier Ministre, Chef du Gouvernement et le President du Conseil National de Transition.

C'est donc une Centrafrique une et unie derriere ses dirigeants qui accueille une personne en difficulte et dans le besoin de trouver une vraie hospitalite.

C'est donc egalement un acte a caractere purement humanitaire, car il ne sera pas dit que la Republique Centrafricaine a deroge a sa tradition sacree d'hospitalite et de terre d'accueil.

Par une etrange coincidence, l'hote de notre pays vient de la lointaine Haiti, le pays de Toussaint LOUVERTURE.  Fils d'esclave et officier general, it s'est battu contre l'oppression, l'esclavage et pour la dignite de l'Homme.  Toussaint LOUVERTURE en est mort, il y a 200 ans tres exactement, loin de la terre d'Afrique d'ou ses ancetres avaient ete deportes.

Le President Aristide y revient aujourd'hui dans des conditions douloureuses.

Lorsqu'un homme dans le besoin frappe a la porte, vous ne voyez ni sa couleur, ni sa race, ni son rang.  Vous l'accueillez et lui offrez le peu que vous avez.  C'est ca le <<GA NZONI>>.

Toutefois, au nom de tous les centrafricains, le President de la Republique tient a assurer le peuple frere d'Haiti de sa solidarite dans l'epreuve qu'il traverse actuellement.  Il souhaite que la paix revienne tres vite dans cette ile des Caraibes, pour le mieux-etre de tous les haitiens.  Il compte egalement sur la comprehension et la solidarite de la Communaute Internationale.

                                                                Fait a Bangui, le 29 fevrier 2004

 

 



 

Deces aux Cayes de Jean Madichon Leader Populaire

JEAN MADICHON

Martyr de la Cause et de la Race

 

Il est parti comme ils nous etait venu, un beau jour de la pleine lune...

 

LEADER TROPICAL, il avait cesser de rever a la reussite des changements souhaites par ses differents prises de positions des annees ’86. 

 

LEADER POPULAIRE, son nom restera grave dans la memoire de ses compagnons de route. 

 

LEADER CONSEQUENT, il avait mene le bon combat.

 

Paix a son ame.

******************


HAITI AND THE UN

By Serge Beaulieu
UN Bureau Chief  

United Nations, January 27, 2004 (CNS NEWS)  

After more than a year of meeting after meeting about the situation in Haiti with top representatives of the Organization of American States in Washington , the question has been bounced over to the Caricom countries.  Last week, after a high level meeting in the Bahamas,  presided over by Jamaica’s Prime Minister Patterson, the question of sending troops to restore order in this turbulent island country was again introduced.  

For the last two months, demonstrators have occupied the streets of Haiti’s capital city Port-au-Prince as well as Gonaives, Cap Haitien, and other towns, calling for the departure of President Jean Bertrand Aristide.  Some students and other demonstrators have been killed.  President Aristide’s partisans organized a counter demonstration saying that their president will not budge, creating a conflict which nears the point of anarchy.  

Early Tuesday it was announced that the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who has been playing a passive role on the Haitian question, met in Paris with President Jacques Chirac and his his Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin trying to find a way out.  Although the spokesperson for the Secretary-General did not reveal the content of the discussion, there is no doubt that a solution has to be found for the case of Haiti, which has been dominating the news.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

À l'occasion des festivités du cent-cinquantième anniversaire de l'Indépendance d'Haïti, Gonaïves fût le théâtre de grandioses manifestations patriotiques. Pour cet événement le Générale Paul E. Magloire, alors président s'était rendu dans cette ville avec les membres du gouvernement. Au premier plan: De gauche à droite, Joseph Nemours Pierre-Louis, M. et Mme. Ducasse Jumelle, M. et Mme. Paul E. Magloire, le Colonel Antoine Levelt et sa femme, M. et Mme. Charles Fombrun, M. Urbain Débrosse et le Colonel Henri Fils-Aimé.

 

Smithsonian Folklife Festival Celebrates
The Bicentennial of the Haitian Revolution
"Haiti: Freedom and Creativity... from the Mountains to the Sea"

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

December 15, 2003

Dear Friend,

Preparations are under way for the 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, when
an expected 1 million visitors will experience the arts, music, foods,
storytelling and rich craft traditions of Haiti - one of the first
independent Republics in the Americas to win and maintain its freedom (the
first was the United States). Haiti is the first nation surviving to the
present day that was created by formerly enslaved people of African descent.

The idea for a Festival program on Haiti originated with members of the U.S.
Haitian community in solidarity with the people of Haiti. "Haiti: Freedom
and Creativity... from the Mountains to the Sea" is perhaps the largest
event in the United States in a yearlong commemoration of the 200th
anniversary of the Haitian Revolution. For 10 days leading up to the
American Independence Day celebration on the Fourth of July, the Festival
will host more than 100 traditional artists and crafts persons, performers,
cooks, writers, researchers and cultural experts from Haiti in performances,
demonstrations, workshops and concerts outdoors on the National Mall in
Washington, D.C., between the U.S. Capitol and the Washington Monument.

The Festival, which runs June 23-27, 2004 and June 30-July 4, will also
feature programs on the maritime arts of the Mid-Atlantic region and the
first of four yearly programs on Latino music.

"Haiti: Freedom and Creativity... from the Mountains to the Sea" will mark
the 1804 Haitian Revolution, which was itself inspired by the American and
French revolutions, and in turn inspired struggles for independence in many
countries from Venezuela to Poland and played a key role in the struggle for
the abolition of slavery in the United States. The Festival program will
highlight traditions that are intimately connected to these struggles and
illustrate how the Haitian people have used the creative arts to express
their aspirations and assure their survival and liberty.

On hand will be Haitian master stone carvers engaged in the restoration of
the Citadel commissioned in 1805 by Haiti’s first leader Dessalines and
completed under the reign of his successor, King Henri Christophe. Haitian
traditional cooks will prepare "Soupe Giraumon" (pumpkin soup), a meal
created and first shared on Jan. 1, 1804 in celebration of the Haitian
Declaration of Independence; other artists will perform "rara" music,
carnival processions and other rites of resistance and liberty. The program
will also suggest the diversity of the Haitian people, through presentations
reflecting the occupational, craft and architectural traditions varying
regionally, from the pottery of Haiti’s mountain highlands to the
boat-building and net-making along the coastline.

Research and curatorial work is now under way on the island of Haiti by more
than two dozen scholars and educators led by a joint Haitian-Smithsonian
curatorial team of architect Patrick Delatour, sculptor Patrick Vilaire and
folklorist Diana Baird N'Diaye.

According to Geri Benoit, head of the Haitian National Commission for the
Bicentennial Celebration, the program "presents a prime opportunity to
showcase the cultural creativity of the Haitian people as an expression of
their passion for freedom and liberty. It will strengthen the ties between
the Haitian people and those in the diaspora and inform and educate
Americans and international visitors about Haitian history, culture and
traditions."

The history of Haiti is intimately tied to that of the United States. Henri
Christophe fought alongside George Washington’s troops during the
Revolutionary War (in Savannah, Ga.) that led to the creation of the United
States. As a nation which defeated the French, Haiti played an important
role in making possible the Louisiana Purchase.

The leadership committee for the Haiti program is chaired by Sens.
Christopher Dodd and Mike DeWine and includes Sen. Hillary Clinton.
Partnering with the Smithsonian Institution’s Center for Folklife and
Cultural Heritage in the development of the Haiti program are Dr. Leslie
Voltaire, head of the Ministry of the Haitians living Abroad; Géri Benoit,
president of IFE (Institut Femmes Entrepreneurs); and the National
Organization for the Advancement of Haitians, along with several Haiti - and
U.S. - based nonprofit organizations and NGOs.

The annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival, inaugurated in 1967, celebrates
folk culture with people from across the United States and around the world.
The Festival typically includes daily programs of music, song and dance,
crafts and cooking demonstrations, storytelling, workshops and narrative
sessions for discussing cultural issues. The Festival attracts about 1
million visitors a year. It is produced by the Smithsonian Center for
Folklife and Cultural Heritage and is co-sponsored by the National Park
Service.

About the Center  - The Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural
Heritage promotes the understanding and continuity of contemporary
grassroots cultures in the United States and abroad. The Center produces the
Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, exhibitions,
documentary films and videos, symposia, and educational materials. The
Center conducts ethnographic and cultural policy oriented research,
maintains a documentary archival collection, and provides educational and
research opportunities.

The Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage is located at 750 9th Street,
NW, Suite 4100, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560-0953.
Telephone: (202) 275-1150. Fax: (202) 275-1119.

 

 


 

 

 


 

 


 


UNDP—ON THE MARK

By Serge Beaulieu
U.N. Bureau Chief

United Nations, New York, July 10, 2003 (CNS NEWS)

Every year the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) introduces a study that grades 175 countries around the globe. The placement indicator is a subject of pride for certain countries and a wakeup call for others, especially in the developing world.

This year Norway, Iceland, Sweden, Australia, and Holland have been graded as among the top five where air is fresher, food is tastier, and life in general is better.

Belgium, the United States, Canada, Japan, and Switzerland follow as the next best in the top ten. England holds the thirteenth position, while France, Germany, and Spain occupy the 17th, 18th, and 19th positions.

Barbados, the little Caribbean island, is graded as 27th, while Bahamas and Cuba are 49th and 52nd on the scale.

Sierra Leone is at the bottom of the list, together with a bunch of other African countries including Nigeria, Zambia, Angola, Chad, Ethiopia, and Burundi.

Although the presentation of the 367 page blue book is a subject of pride for those who prepared it, it is not an indication that the UNDP as an institution is fulfilling its mission.

At a press conference to present the book, UNDP experts were on hand to explain the contents of the publication filled with graphics and mumbo-jumbo explanations. They even attempted to answer questions? Which questions? Why are the African countries at the bottom of the list, including Nigeria? When will there be a breakthrough for the developing world? When will those countries, so filled with natural resources, be able to see the light of day? Where did the United Nations fail to promote sustainable and durable development? Of course those questions were not asked.

The United Nations Development Programme, which started about 50 years ago as a small institution promoting a tiny fishing project in Haiti, mushroomed into such a bureaucracy that it has developed into a worldwide politically oriented network. Obviously, the hope of promoting development in the Third World was not realized.

In June 1945 at Lake Success, Trygve Lie, then secretary-general of the United Nations, introducing the report of the first United Nations technical mission to the Republic of Haiti, said:

The United Nations mission of technical assistance to the Republic of Haiti deserves attention as a new departure in United Nations activities. Undertaken at the request of the Haitian government under Economic and Social Council Resolution 51 (IV) of 26 March 1947, it gives impetus to General Assembly Resolution 200 (III) of 4 December 1948 on technical assistance for economic development, deliberated on and finally adopted while the experts drawn from the United Nations Secretariat, the Food and Agricultural Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and the World Health Organization were actively engaged in Haiti in investigation of the country’s development problems. This mission is, in a sense, a precursor of the ampler efforts which it is hoped the international organizations concerned will be enabled to display in realization of the bold program of technical assistance to underdeveloped countries envisaged by the President of the United States and the United Nations contribution to which will be discussed at the forthcoming session of the Economic and Social Council. The mission having now submitted its report, the analysis and recommendations of which have been duly brought to the Haitian government’s attention, I have pleasure in making it public in full accord with the President of the Republic of Haiti.

That project was named the Rosenberg Mission to Haiti in honor of Oscar Rosenberg, a national of Sweden, who served as chief of mission. Now, 54 years later, Haiti, whose project launched the institution, is ranked 150 on the UNDP index, having dropped from 146 in the last study. Is there hope for any country?

 

 



 

 


Children walk along the shore in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.  According to United Nations statistics, 30% of children born in Haiti will never reach the age of 40.


Sondra Singer Beaulieu

CHILDREN – THE WORLD’S FUTURE

There are over 2.1 billion children in the world.
Over 10.5 million children die each year, often from readily preventable causes. 

An estimated 150 million children around the world are malnourished. 

Over 120 million children never go to school – many of them girls. 

THE CIVIL RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS OF CHILDREN

Every child has the right to:
A name and nationality;

Protection from being deprived of his or her identity;

Freedom of expression;

Freedom of thought, conscience and religion;

Freedom of association and peaceful assembly;

Information from a diversity of sources;

Privacy;

Protection from torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment;

Protection against unlawful arrest and unjustified deprivation of liberty.

 

LINDA BAKER OF CNS NEWS WITH HAITIAN CHILDREN AT MORNE BRIEU, PORT SALUT, IN THE SOUTHERN PART OF HAITI

 



 

MANIFESTE DE VERTAILLIS

  1. Nous, leaders politiques, Representants, Partisans, Amis, sommes reunis ce jour 12 Octobre 1990 a Vertaillis en vue de faire Notre auto-critique, fixer les responsables politiques sur notre societe durant ces 30 derniers annees.
  2. Avons ete a l’ecoute des revendications populaires apres les evenements du 7 fevrier 86 et avons entendu les doleances d’autres couches de notre societe.
  3. Avons compris que les buts vises durant ces 30 derniers annees n’ont pas ete atteints a cause d’une certaine Pratique politique erigeant la corruption en systeme tout en excusant de leur responsabilitie ceux qui avaient la charge de diriger les affaires de l’etat.
  4. En consequence, nous denoncons ces pratiques politiques consistant a favoriser "l’individu denomme partisan" au detriement des priorites de la grande masse.
  5. Denoncons ces partiques consistant a l’elimination systematique des elements de valeur de notre societe, les obligeant a fuir le territoire National sous pretexte que toutes differences d’opinions representent une trahison a la cause que nous avions imposer commer la seule valable.
  6. Comprenons que ces pratiques politiques sont d’origine tribales, mais nous les avons pousser "inextremis" dans le but de propulser une cause qui n’etait pas toujours bien definie. Nous denoncons du meme coup, la lachete de ceux qui avaient les moyens d’y remedier.
  7. Denoncons aussi notre irresponsabilite a l’egard de ceux qui voulaient operer un changement dans l’ordre des choses.
  8. Reconnaissons que la cause principale de cette mauvaise gerance decoule de notre immaturite politique et du fait que cette classe politique a ete trop longtemps deprivee de sa paticipation a la gestion de la chose publique. Qu’en y accendant nous avons commis les memes erreurs que nos predecesseurs.
  9. Condamnons cette politique ancestrale consistant a diriger l’haitien en clans hostiles dans le but de diviser la nation avec elle meme.
  10. Constatons l’echec de l’ideologie propulsee durant ces 30 dernieres annees a cause d’une mauvaise lecture de la situation haitienne par les responables politiques sans exception.
  11. Saluons avec joie, la mise en branle d’un nouveau depart avec une nouvelle equipe renoncant aux anciennes pratiques qui n’ont fait honneur ni a notre histoire ni a notre culture.
  12. Recommandons que ces 12 points soient connus comme le manifeste d’une classe politique acceptant ses responsabilities, decidee a travailler dans le cadre du processus democratique en vue d’arriver a "l'Unite de la Famille Haitienne.

Presente par M. Serge Beaulieu
President (PAN)
Parti Authentique National

Approuve par Acclamation, Assemblee Generale, Congres de Vertaillis

12 Octobre 1990

 











                       

                                             


 

                                                      


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